Selected Poetry

Selected Poetry Though critical opinion on Alexander Pope has frequently been divided he is now regarded as the most important poet of the early eighteenth century An invalid from infancy he devoted his energies to

  • Title: Selected Poetry
  • Author: Alexander Pope Pat Rogers
  • ISBN: 9780192834942
  • Page: 492
  • Format: Paperback
  • Though critical opinion on Alexander Pope has frequently been divided, he is now regarded as the most important poet of the early eighteenth century An invalid from infancy, he devoted his energies towards literature and achieved remarkable success with his first published work at the age of twenty one A succession of brilliant poems followed, including An Essay on CritiThough critical opinion on Alexander Pope has frequently been divided, he is now regarded as the most important poet of the early eighteenth century An invalid from infancy, he devoted his energies towards literature and achieved remarkable success with his first published work at the age of twenty one A succession of brilliant poems followed, including An Essay on Criticism 1711 , Windsor Forest 1715 , and his masterpiece, The Rape of the Lock A second period of great poetry was begun in 1728 with the appearance of the first Dunciad All these works which exhibit Pope s astonishing human insight, his wide sympathies, and powers of social observation displayed to greatest effect in his talent for satire are included in this selection of his poetry It has been compiled by the distinguished Pope scholar and editor Pat Rodgers, who also provides an indispensable introduction that offers a new interpretation of Pope s poetry, and the philosophical ideas behind it.

    One thought on “Selected Poetry”

    1. I love the density of this poetry and I dig a lot of his critiques. I like when I see Milton peeking through. And I especially like how important Pope makes the role of the critic. But I have the hardest time knowing what the hell is going on, for like the first five stanzas or so. Where are we? Who the hell are you talking to? Too much ceremony, apostrophe? I don't know. And I read for a living.

    2. Pope ranks third behind Shakespeare and the King James Version of the Bible when it comes to familiar lines in our language. This addition of Pope, while not having all of his poems (it lacks the Essay on Man), does have several masterpieces, notably Essay on Criticism and the Rape of the Lock. Rape of the LockThis is very near to the perfect piece of poetry. Indeed, what glory could have come by writing a true piece of heroic poetry in this style?! C. S. Lewis once said that reading Spenser is [...]

    3. Pope is irrefutably an intellectual poet and commands his verse form, rhyme scheme and metrical rhythm with arresting ease; I especially loved his peppered inclusion of classical allusions and imagery which added much to his satirising of contemporary sophistication and decorum. Although his most renowned poem now The Rape of the Lock actually pales for me in comparison with both his Dunciad and my personal favourite Eloisa to Abelard. While not his forte I think Pope's rhyming couplets so perfe [...]

    4. .How happy is the blameless vestal's lot!The world forgetting, by the world forgot.Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind!Each pray'r accepted, and each wish resign'd;Labour and rest, that equal periods keep;"Obedient slumbers that can wake and weep;"Desires compos'd, affections ever ev'n,Tears that delight, and sighs that waft to Heav'n.Grace shines around her with serenest beams,And whisp'ring angels prompt her golden dreams.For her th' unfading rose of Eden blooms,And wings of seraphs shed div [...]

    5. Popewhat to sayIn his 'An Essay on Criticism' Pope transpires his dislike for 'excessiveness' in poetry, stating that good poetry should be 'understated', he then outlines a standard of what 'is' good taste by using an authoritative tone that condemns his peers while also putting himself into a superior position. And yet, his poems are convoluted and far from 'understated'. He does not really demonstrate any of the skills – of his so admired – classical authors whose work cleverly show wit a [...]

    6. Rhyming couplets shit me to tears. The stilted nature of much of Pope's poetry, the forced rhyme, the incessantly repetitive metre - it lack imagination by todays standards. But one can't judge these works by todays standards, Pope was clever, sublime, and incredibly perceptive for his time. There are some eloquent phrases, and some eloquent verses. Not my cup of tea, but I am a big believer in trying everything once.The notations and footnoting were a bloody shambles as well.

    7. Rape of the Lock = awesome. Funny, charming, and very, very witty. Justifies everything wonderful that has ever been said about Pope. Essay on Criticism = awful. Snotty, hypocritical, poorly written, and infuriating. Justifies everything horrible that has ever been said about Pope. After an Essay on Criticism I was too afraid to read the rest of the book - apparently Pope has multiple personalities and I didn't want to encounter the megalomaniac side again.

    8. I'm not a fan of poetry but I have to read this for university so I decided to suck it up and have a go. The Rape Of The Lock and Eloisa and Abelard were brilliant, but honestly I didn't really understand the rest. A lot of Pope's poems satirise prominent members of the time so most of the references went completely over my head. But I'm actually looking forward to studying it to actually understand the poems and maybe even enjoy them a lot more.

    9. I like Pope well enough, but I have a special fondness for him for one odd reason - a former mentor of mine, Dr. Suter, read some of my poetry and wrote to some of her colleages about how much my verse adaptations of ancient poetry resembled Pope. I've never forgotten the compliment.

    10. Read for:EN1004: Explorers and Revolutionaries - Literature 1680-1830 Technically I only read "The Rape of the Lock." It was interesting enough, after I went to the lectures and understood it better, but it's difficult to grasp if you don't know much about the texts he's parodying. 7/10

    11. I love Pope, but I think that there will be a better selection of his poems out there. This is more like a taster, or an introduction to him I think. It even feels incomplete - somehow.

    12. Would love him if not for the rhyming couplets. They get irritating after about four lines (I'm not exaggerating)

    13. After Shakespeare, Pope is surely the most influential writer in the English language, he is also the funniest.

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