Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative

Suffer the Children The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative With than four million American children diagnosed with ADHD and other psychiatric disorders taking a child to a psychiatrist is as common as taking them to soccer practice But disturbingly a great

  • Title: Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative
  • Author: Marilyn Wedge
  • ISBN: 9780393071597
  • Page: 195
  • Format: Hardcover
  • With than four million American children diagnosed with ADHD and other psychiatric disorders, taking a child to a psychiatrist is as common as taking them to soccer practice But, disturbingly, a great number of children experience dangerous emotional and physical side effects from psychotropic medications Where can parents who are eager to avoid shaming labels and dWith than four million American children diagnosed with ADHD and other psychiatric disorders, taking a child to a psychiatrist is as common as taking them to soccer practice But, disturbingly, a great number of children experience dangerous emotional and physical side effects from psychotropic medications Where can parents who are eager to avoid shaming labels and drugs turn when their child exhibits disturbing behavior Suffer the Children presents a much needed alternative child focused family therapy A family therapist for over twenty years, Marilyn Wedge shares the stories of her patients Wedge presents creative strategies that flow from viewing children s symptoms not as biologically determined disorders but as responses to relationships in their lives that can be altered with the help of a therapist.Instructive, illuminating, and uplifting, Suffer the Children radically reframes how we as parents, as health professionals, and as a society can respond to problems of childhood in a considerate and respectful fashion.

    One thought on “Suffer the Children: The Case against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative”

    1. It's hard to assign a star rating to this book. On the one hand, I think that Wedge's message about the perils of over-labeling and over-medicating young children is an important one, and I appreciate that rather than simply sounding the alarm she also provides ample discussion of a viable alternative--family therapy. And I do think that many of the strategies and insights she notes as a family therapist could prove to be useful alternatives to drugs and psychiatric labeling in situations like t [...]

    2. I finished this book a few days ago, but I didn't want to write this review until I had mulled it over a few days. Ultimately, I do not believe that this book would be very helpful for parents, especially not the parents I typically work with so I will not be recommending it. Like the author, I am often troubled by what seems to be a rapid labeling of children's behaviors. I also agree with the author that many children's problems have a genesis in their families of origin. For example, almost a [...]

    3. Have just started today, already I think it is an interesting background to I've been fortunate to watch David Epston (Narrative Therapy) draw out and strengthen the threads of a story of hope. This book talks about the power of labels, and how today it seems so easy to arrive at a diagnosis that involves medicating children. While acknowledging that there are some children who benefit, the book goes deeper looking at the family system. I found that the book spelled it out clearly, without judge [...]

    4. An excellent book that presents an alternative approach to the insanity overtaking American pediatric care.

    5. I rarely post about specific books that I couldn't finish, but I'm making an exception here for Suffer the Children: The Case Against Labeling and Medicating and an Effective Alternative by Marilyn Wedge. It has been awhile since a book has gotten me so angry and frustrated - and it is rare when a book does that. This one accomplished both.For starters, I'll admit that I only lasted 17 pages with this one, so maybe I should just shut up already. The premise, however, was a promising one. From th [...]

    6. While I found this book to be useful, I agree with what other reviews have stated: that the author tends to over simplify many of the situations and does not give very many examples of children with MAJOR problems. When I was first reading Suffer the Children I seriously thought this therapist was too good to be true, because she definitely toots her own horn quite a bit. More than half way through she FINALLY shows us that she is indeed human and has been unsuccessful with some severe cases, bu [...]

    7. Highly recommended to read! It will open your eyes to the world of children and alternative therapy. People always have doubt with alternative therapy but this book is beutifully written not to convince the readers with boring facts but with familiar problems that we have heard of in our daily lives. The take home message in the book will definitely enrich you!

    8. This would have been way more effective if she removed the scaremongering about meds and technology at the beginning and end. The actual family therapy part was interesting and informative although her practice doesn't seem to cover single moms or children with severe problems

    9. I only read about half of this. It was VERY anecdotal. The author's basic theme is that parents are responsible for all (or the vast majority of) their children's problems. Maybe she's right. It's hard to say. I found anecdotes somewhat unconvincing.

    10. From a therapist's perspective that has been working in a very medicalized agency and trying to get back to roots of family systems this was a great place to start and be reminded that a lot of problems can be solved with family therapy and not medication.

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