Black Talk

Black Talk Black Music whether it be jazz blues rb gospel or soul has always expressed consciously or not its African oral heritage reflecting the conditions of a minority culture in the midst of a white

  • Title: Black Talk
  • Author: Ben Sidran
  • ISBN: 9780306801846
  • Page: 436
  • Format: Paperback
  • Black Music whether it be jazz, blues, rb, gospel, or soul has always expressed, consciously or not, its African oral heritage, reflecting the conditions of a minority culture in the midst of a white majority Black Talk is one of those rare books since LeRoi Jones s Blues People to examine the social function of black music in the diaspora it sounds the depths ofBlack Music whether it be jazz, blues, rb, gospel, or soul has always expressed, consciously or not, its African oral heritage, reflecting the conditions of a minority culture in the midst of a white majority Black Talk is one of those rare books since LeRoi Jones s Blues People to examine the social function of black music in the diaspora it sounds the depths of experience and maps the history of a culture from the jazz age to the revolutionary outbursts of the 1960s Ben Sidran finds radical challenges to the Western, white literary tradition in such varied music as Buddy Bolden s loud and hoarse cornet style, the call and response between brass and reeds in a swing band, the emotionalism of gospel, the primitivism of Ornette Coleman, and the cool ethic of bebop The musician is the document, says Sidran He is the information himself The impact of stored information is transmitted not through records or archives, but through the human response to life.

    One thought on “Black Talk”

    1. Good on history of jazz, highlighting the cultural divide between black and white American culture. Sidran basically claims that black culture is based on unbroken oral tradition, whereas WASP America has a literary tendency (he never calles this latter culture anal, but it's quite obviously the counterpoint to oral in the double meaning that this text sets up).Black Talk is not so strong on free jazz, though. From the 70's books on free jazz Val Wilmer's "As serious as your life" and Comolli's [...]

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *