Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men: A History of the American Civil War

Emancipating Slaves Enslaving Free Men A History of the American Civil War Emancipating Slaves Enslaving Free Men is an exciting narrative history offering fresh insights into many aspects of the Civil War This is a lucid edifying account of the Civil War era Mr Hummel has

  • Title: Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men: A History of the American Civil War
  • Author: Jeffrey Rogers Hummel
  • ISBN: 9780812693126
  • Page: 325
  • Format: Paperback
  • Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men is an exciting narrative history offering fresh insights into many aspects of the Civil War This is a lucid, edifying account of the Civil War era Mr Hummel has an impressive command of the relevant contemporary literature His interpretations are thoughtful, often provocative, always well worth considering, Civil War buffs will wEmancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men is an exciting narrative history offering fresh insights into many aspects of the Civil War This is a lucid, edifying account of the Civil War era Mr Hummel has an impressive command of the relevant contemporary literature His interpretations are thoughtful, often provocative, always well worth considering, Civil War buffs will want this book on their shelves Kenneth M Stampp University of California, Berkeley Hummel presents some uncomfortable truths for both sides of the Civil War For the South, Hummel builds a case that the war was indeed about slavery For the North, he shows that a war to preserve the union was morally bankrupt and that freeing the slaves was the only justifiable reason for fighting Yet Hummel demonstrates that even a war for such a noble cause was probably unnecessary, since slavery was politically doomed in an independent South Hummel also illustrates some of the cost of the war, such as Lincoln g suppression of political opposition, the closing of dissenting newspapers, and the creation of big government under Republicans Lincoln, Johnson, and Grant Library Journal In this insightful treatment of the Civil War addressing the causes, the war itself and Reconstruction , Hummel s text argues against the thesis that armed confrontation was inevitable With its insight d analysis not to mention the extensive bibliographical essays that elaborate each chapter , Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men will supply both the academic and Civil War buff with an added perspective on the causes and consequences of the Civil War Publishers Weekly

    One thought on “Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men: A History of the American Civil War”

    1. Finished this incredibly book in April and wanted to do an adequate review ever since, but never made the time, DAMN! But I did secure the author as my 8th annual Mises Celebration speaker for 1 October 2016: 2016-misescelebration.eventbriThe reason of course, is that I was blown away by the book, and the author speaking at a local lunch discussion group, The Mont Hamilton Society.I have known the author for about 15 years, but not well. I have my disagreements with some of his political/economi [...]

    2. An interesting take on the Civil War. One always sees history books in school practically revere Lincoln as a diety, but this book takes an entirely different approach. Did President Lincoln have the authority, according to the CONSTITUTION, to rule as he did? Dd he follow the Constitution as he ruled the USA? And, did he change the laws and customs of our land?According to Hummel, not really. Now, this was during a war, you would say, but Hummel maintains the tactics Lincoln and his administrat [...]

    3. Even though I don't agree with all his arguments (and don't share his Friedmanesque economic beliefs), I have to say Hummel has given us a truly stunning book. Every page sparkles with fresh insights and novel but well-supported ideas. If you've only read Catton and Foote and so on, be prepared for lots of surprises. As if that weren't enough, each chapter is followed by a bibliographic treatise which is sometimes even more entertaining than the main matter which has preceded it. Hummel is parti [...]

    4. I took a class with Jeffrey Hummel at San Jose State, and he, like his book, is incredibly clear thinking and erudite. This is a college-text level book, and I found myself finding those pockets of ignorance in my US History knowledge. You will never look at slavery and the War Between the States in the same way, once you digest the economic side of the issue. I highly recommend this book.

    5. This is the first Civil War history I've read cover-to-cover. The bibliographical essays between each chapter are a marvel of scholarship and style unto themselves. The chapters are concise, yet broad and fair to both Union and Confederate events. 'The Political Economy of Slavery and Secession' and 'Republican Neo-Mercantilism Versus Confederate War Socialism' are but two of the chapters. Most histories I have come across neglect the economic angle as well as shortchange secession as a worthy s [...]

    6. A fairly straightforward history of the Civil War, with extensive bibliographical notes discussing scholarly works on each topic, what the controversies are, and where the writers stand. In the Epilogue, Hummel lays out his own conclusions from a libertarian, economic standpoint: for the South, the war was about slavery. For Lincoln, it was about preventing secession, which was a betrayal of the ideals of the American revolution, the consent of the governed. Hummel argues that if the southern st [...]

    7. Hummel gives a good, fair-minded account of the history of the U.S. Civil War that includes an account of the economics of slavery, the many compromises between the Revolution and the Civil War between slave states and free states, and the political abuses and horror of the war and its aftermath. Lincoln's abuses of the Constitution in the name of preserving the Union were far beyond those of George W. Bush, while the Confederacy was no better (even apart from defending the institution of slaver [...]

    8. Interesting short history of the Civil War and Reconstruction, largely from a libertarian perspective (as the tendentious title may suggest). Unlike most of the books I've read on the Civil War, this one pays a lot less attention to the military aspects in favor of other considerations. Whether you agree or disagree with the author's conclusions, it's a readable book on the period that offers new perspectives on otherwise familiar ground. After I finished, I continued to ponder some of Hummel's [...]

    9. I liked it because it went deeper than the usual civil war coverage of a textbook. I liked that it found fault with the premises of both sides, the war on both sides and the resolution on both sides. History is generally written by the victors, who ignore their flaws. It's also rewritten by the losers, who ignore their flaws, too. This book sometimes hammers home points with the subltely of a sledgehammer, but it's worth slogging through those times.

    10. This book was really good. A history of the Civil War, it doesn't get into battles and military conflict, as much as the economic and in some cases historical surroundings of the Civil War. Though the writing tends to be a bit complicated, the book never sticks to long to one subject, thus providing a clear compare/contrast of North/South issues in an interesting way. I would certainly reccomend it, not just as a Civil War history, but as a history of our country.

    11. Among the finest histories of the War Between the States I've read. Rogers is a libertarian whose political philosophy is closer to that of the Founders than almost any other historian writing. If you prefer reality-based accounts of American history to those cranked out by the court historians ascendant in American academia, you shouldn't miss this one. His explanation of how slavery could be profitable to individual slave owners but disadvantageous overall to the South is excellent.

    12. "Emancipating Slaves, Enslaving Free Men: A History of the American Civil War by Jeffrey Rogers Hummel (1996)"

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