Guerrilla Metaphysics: Phenomenology and the Carpentry of Things

Guerrilla Metaphysics Phenomenology and the Carpentry of Things In Guerrilla Metaphysics Graham Harman develops further the object oriented philosophy first proposed in Tool Being Today s fashionable philosophies often treat metaphysics as a petrified relic of th

  • Title: Guerrilla Metaphysics: Phenomenology and the Carpentry of Things
  • Author: Graham Harman
  • ISBN: 9780812694567
  • Page: 379
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Guerrilla Metaphysics, Graham Harman develops further the object oriented philosophy first proposed in Tool Being Today s fashionable philosophies often treat metaphysics as a petrified relic of the past, and hold that future progress requires an ever further abandonment of all claims to discuss reality in itself Guerrilla Metaphysics makes the opposite assertion, chaIn Guerrilla Metaphysics, Graham Harman develops further the object oriented philosophy first proposed in Tool Being Today s fashionable philosophies often treat metaphysics as a petrified relic of the past, and hold that future progress requires an ever further abandonment of all claims to discuss reality in itself Guerrilla Metaphysics makes the opposite assertion, challenging the dominant philosophy of access both continental and analytic that remains quarantined in discussions of language, perception, or literary texts Philosophy needs a fresh resurgence of the things themselves not merely the words or appearances themselves Once these themes are adapted to the needs of an object oriented philosophy, what emerges is a brand new type of metaphysics a guerrilla metaphysics.

    One thought on “Guerrilla Metaphysics: Phenomenology and the Carpentry of Things”

    1. Definitely one of the more interesting books I have read recently. A premise, that 'Normal' philosophy does not care about objects as such, but only what humans perceive, leads to a heavy deep philosophical/metaphysical hunt for the existence of the non-human experienced world and how it is possible to perceive it at all for any object, including humans. I am not up-to-date on the premises of the book, which may be over-stated, but had great interest, entertainment and new understandings reading [...]

    2. In this book he's saying all kinds of stuff about phenomenology that are ridiculous and in plain contradiction with everything the phenomenologists themselves say. That's fine with me, as long as then a philosophy becomes apparent that, as unphenomenological, grants new possibilities to philosophy. The result is supposed to be some kind of inhumane interaction of beings, but I simply don't get it. Stuck in a phenomenological way of speaking, he tends to fall back into very typical problems of ex [...]

    3. There's a lot of humor and the carnivalesque in Harman's style which made this work great. Using literary terms (metaphor, humor, allure) to describe objective processes was a great twist. I'm not all that interested in metaphysics and the dynamics of objects but the writing was good and the parts where he takes on what modern philosophy has become were worth it. I still think you'd be better off reading a biology or physics textbook if you want to know how things work.NB: Unbelievable, after 13 [...]

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