Jerusalem: Or on Religious Power and Judaism

Jerusalem Or on Religious Power and Judaism A classic text of enduring significance Moses Mendelssohn s Jerusalem stands as a powerful plea for the separation of church and state and also as the first attempt to present Judaism as a relig

  • Title: Jerusalem: Or on Religious Power and Judaism
  • Author: Moses Mendelssohn Allan Arkush Alexander Altmann
  • ISBN: 9780874512649
  • Page: 353
  • Format: Paperback
  • A classic text of enduring significance, Moses Mendelssohn s Jerusalem 1783 stands as a powerful plea for the separation of church and state and also as the first attempt to present Judaism as a religion eminently compatible with the ideas of the Enlightenment Allan Arkush s new translation, drawing upon the great strides made by Mendelssohn research in recent decades,A classic text of enduring significance, Moses Mendelssohn s Jerusalem 1783 stands as a powerful plea for the separation of church and state and also as the first attempt to present Judaism as a religion eminently compatible with the ideas of the Enlightenment Allan Arkush s new translation, drawing upon the great strides made by Mendelssohn research in recent decades, does full justice to contemporary insights into the subject while authentically reflecting a distinguished eighteenth century text Alexander Altmann s learned introduction opens up the complex structure and background of Mendelssohn s ideas His detailed commentary, keyed to the text, provides references to literary sources and interpretations of the philosopher s intent.

    One thought on “Jerusalem: Or on Religious Power and Judaism”

    1. Ce livre est un essai politique et religieux rédigé par Moses Mendelssohn, juif allemand du dix-huitième siècle. Autodidacte, en dépit d'une enfance difficile, il put acquérir de grandes connaissances, et même s'initier à la philosophie, celle des anglais Hobbes et Locke en particulier, en plus des humanités et du savoir religieux juif. Son érudition et sa sagesse le firent apprécier par des hommes éclairés de toute l'Europe, en particulier par Lessing, qui le peint de manière amic [...]

    2. Mendelssohn was the leading philosopher of the Haskalah, or Jewish Enlightenment. Jerusalem is one of the most significant works about the relationship between religion and the state in the European tradition of political philosophy, but it is rarely read as such, because it has (rather irritatingly and condescendingly) been defined as a part of the history of Jewish thought only -- despite the fact that Mendelssohn engages with the arguments of Hobbes and Locke, and conducted a correspondence w [...]

    3. The first half of Jerusalem is definitely my favourite. Mendelssohn has a great gift for writing and he engages even the uninitiated reader very well. There are some pieces of his discussion that might be hard to understand to people who haven't read any Hobbes or Leibniz but on the whole it's very accessible. Mendelssohn discusses the nature of the state in relation to religion in ways that modern societies are still trying to grasp and it is a treatise that will not fail to challenge and infor [...]

    4. "The ideas of right and duty, of power and obligation, have been better developed; one has learned to distinguish more correctly between physical and moral ability, between might and right. These distinctions have become so intimately fused with our language that, nowadays, the refutation of Hobbes's system seems to be a matter of common sense, and to be accomplished, as it were, by language itself. This is distinctive of all moral truths. As soon as they are brought to light, they become so muc [...]

    5. בספרו "ירושלים" מציג מנדלסון את תפיסתו כי המפגש בין העולם היהודי המסורתי לבין העולם החדש המשכילי אפשרי ורצוי. הוא דן, בין השאר, ביחס שבין המדינה לדת, ומדגיש את חשיבות הסובלנות הדתית ואת הדרכים ליישומה. וזאת במגמה לקדם את הרעיון של שוויון זכויות ליהודים ואת העיקרון של הפרדת הדת [...]

    6. Mendelssohn dedicó la primera parte de su obra "Jerusalén o acerca del poder religioso y el judaísmo" de 1783, a argumentar a favor de la distinción y separación entre el Estado y la Iglesia. Según su posición, el fin del Estado es el bienestar de los ciudadanos, el cual no implica únicamente su supervivencia terrenal sino también su perfeccionamiento espiritual y la felicidad de los hombres. En este sentido, Mendelssohn establece allí que el Estado debe favorecer el desarrollo de la r [...]

    7. 1/14/17: Read it for Modern Jewish Thought my last semester at UNC. Some very good moments but unsurprisingly dense. Will write more once I re-read it.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *