The Plot: A Biography Of An English Acre

The Plot A Biography Of An English Acre Guardian columnist Madeleine Bunting is one of the most high profile commentators in Britain Her father was deeply conservative with romantic old fashioned views about England After his death wanti

  • Title: The Plot: A Biography Of An English Acre
  • Author: Madeleine Bunting
  • ISBN: 9781847080851
  • Page: 476
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Guardian columnist Madeleine Bunting is one of the most high profile commentators in Britain Her father was deeply conservative, with romantic, old fashioned views about England After his death, wanting to understand him better, Bunting began to explore his passionate, lifelong attachment to a small plot of land in North Yorkshire Delving deep into the rich history of Guardian columnist Madeleine Bunting is one of the most high profile commentators in Britain Her father was deeply conservative, with romantic, old fashioned views about England After his death, wanting to understand him better, Bunting began to explore his passionate, lifelong attachment to a small plot of land in North Yorkshire Delving deep into the rich history of this acre, she uncovers traces of its Neolithic inhabitants and of the Cistercian monks she learns of the medieval battles and considers the changing face of agriculture and leisure The result sheds a fascinating light on what a contested, layered place England is, and on what belonging to a place might mean to all of us The Plot is an original, heartfelt, and deeply political book.

    One thought on “The Plot: A Biography Of An English Acre”

    1. It actually took me 150 pages to really get into the book. As Bunting didn't really like her father, who was distant and following his own creative vision, it was hard to get drawn in. At it's best very beautiful nature writing that took me close to the Moors, especially when she was describing the Byland Abbey ruins.

    2. A thoroughly enjoyable exploration of the history and social context of an acre of land in rural North Yorkshire. Always relating her musings back to her father's attachment and use of this plot, Bunting keeps a strong, personal thread of the value of a sense of place running throughout.

    3. Good stuff in patches. Interesting history of a part of the North York Moors (near Sutton Bank) that I know well. I lost interest in places though

    4. At its best this book is a riveting account of the Yorkshire moors through history. A refreshing Northern narrative perspective of England's growth through the last millennia. At its worst it's a moaning and unloved child trying to come to terms with her father and his distance.The historical, anthropological and sociological components are absolutely fascinating. The necessity of sheep to maintain the landscape and the importance they had in developing the economy of the area is extremely inter [...]

    5. As a journalist, Bunting is best on the research of a place she grew up with, although the passages dealing with her father can seem less polished. I liked Bunting when she wrote for The Guardian, this reads like a breakout book where she begins to combine memoir, research and a gut awareness of the state of the nation.

    6. Really enjoyed the information in this book and unlike 'The Hebridean Journey' this book had a strong connection with the author as the basis for the book is discovering the place that her father made his own.

    7. Stared up at the Kilburn White Horse she writes about this July. Gazed down from Sutton Bank, less than a mile from her family's land. Had I read this before, I could have possibly seen the centuries of history unfold

    8. In a way the title of this book is misleading. It's a book about so much more than a small plot of land, covering history, geography, natural history and human relationships. In fact, a lot of the subjects covered in the book have nothing at all to do with "the plot", and yet it serves to bring them all together as the author's main point of focus from which to branch out.As others have commented, not a great deal has happened on the actual plot itself, other than the construction of a small cha [...]

    9. This is more of a biography than a natural history book, and that is no bad thing.John Bunting was a well known sculptor and artist, and this book is his daughter trying to find out about her father by using the lens of 'The Plot' a small parcel of land in the Yorkshire Dales, and considering aspects of his life in this context.On this plot his built from scratch a small chapel as he was a devout catholic. There was also another small building that was modestly furnished. This was what he used a [...]

    10. c2009. Chosen as a result of a recommendation in the National Trust magazine. The quote by Robert Macfarlane on the front cover is "A seriously good book".d it is. Packed full of really interesting facts interlaced with memories of family. Beautifully written. Surprising revelations such as when the British were fighting in France for the Allies in the First World War because of the timber famine in England, the British authorities had to beg (!) the French government to be allowed to fell timbe [...]

    11. I really like the idea of writing a biography of a particular piece of land - England is such a small country, in comparison to a lot of others, with so much history that it seems quite likely that most patches of land have seen great events pass over them - battles, rebellions, murders. Unfortunately it seems Ms Bunting is attached to a parcel of land that hasn't really seen much of any of that, perhaps this is because it seems to be quite an isolated part of North Yorkshire. It is mainly polit [...]

    12. In 1944, the day of the D-Day landings, John Bunting was out walking with his schoolfriends. Seventeen years later he returned to buy the abandoned farm on the drover's road where he would have turned to look at the view of Yorkshire spread below. A sculptor, he built a chapel, filled it with his carvings. In this book, his daughter tries after his death to understand the significance this corner of land held for him. Lovely writing that gets right under the skin of this part of the Yorkshire la [...]

    13. This was probably therapeutic to write, but it isn't very interesting to read when you don't know any of the people involved. I liked the idea of a biography of a piece of land, and I liked the chapter about sheep, but the problem with this particular plot of land is that nothing much happened there.

    14. This is a gently paced book, lyrical in places, which gradually seduces you into the history of a small one acre plot of land in North Yorkshire. It goes to show there's a book for just about every reader out there.

    15. An intriguing way of coming to terms with the death of a difficult parent. Praising and appreciating what he loved and appreciated. Finding common ground in ground. I didn't know wool hassock little value it is seen as industrial waste.

    16. A most enjoyable read .I think we all dream of having our own acre somewhere but Madeleine Bunting's Father owned his to the exclusion of his family. A sad story of a man living on borrowed time , creating in his chapel a shrine to his imagined childhood heroes .

    17. The history was interesting the combination of the history of the area with the author's attempt to understand her father, not so much.

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