Michael Robartes and the Dancer (Collected Works of W.B. Yeats)

Michael Robartes and the Dancer Collected Works of W B Yeats Published during the blossoming of Yeats s maturity between The Wild Swans at Coole and The Tower Michael Robartes and the Dancer includes poems that confronted central political pe

  • Title: Michael Robartes and the Dancer (Collected Works of W.B. Yeats)
  • Author: W.B. Yeats
  • ISBN: 9780742629851
  • Page: 202
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Published during the blossoming of Yeats s maturity, between The Wild Swans at Coole 1919 and The Tower 1928 , Michael Robartes and the Dancer 1920 includes poems that confronted central political, personal, and philosophical issues This volume presents all the extant manuscripts for the poems in the collection, which Yeats wrote between 1914 and 1919, a critical perPublished during the blossoming of Yeats s maturity, between The Wild Swans at Coole 1919 and The Tower 1928 , Michael Robartes and the Dancer 1920 includes poems that confronted central political, personal, and philosophical issues This volume presents all the extant manuscripts for the poems in the collection, which Yeats wrote between 1914 and 1919, a critical period that included his marriage.

    One thought on “Michael Robartes and the Dancer (Collected Works of W.B. Yeats)”

    1. Strangely repetitive in the manner of his earlier works, but still a fair few great poems and lines. It's a weak 4 for me, but it's certainly still one of the top three collections of his to this point.

    2. I feel a bit guilty giving this only three stars, because it contains the truly astonishing poem "The Second Coming", which has justly earned the accolades it's received since publication. The rest of the collection, however, did very little for me. I can see that some of the poems are put together well, and the overtly political ones are a bit more interesting than the rest, but other than "The Second Coming" there's not one that I'd be likely to bother reading again, to be honest.

    3. The main work here is the oft-quoted "The Second Coming", but it feels like the odd poem out. Where "TSC" uses overtly Biblical imagery to evoke, distantly, a political theme, there are others that are fabricated dialogues between Irish political leaders, etc. So much more overtly political. There is some very personal material here as well, not just to Yeats's family but to his cause and nation as well, and it's this that represents the vast majority here. (As an aside, something that partly un [...]

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