The Passionate Epicure: La Vie et la Passion de Dodin-Bouffant, Gourmet

The Passionate Epicure La Vie et la Passion de Dodin Bouffant Gourmet In the classic French novel The Passionate Epicure Marcel Rouff introduces Dodin Bouffant a character based loosely on Anthelme Brillat Savarin an infamous bachelor and epicure dedicated to the hig

  • Title: The Passionate Epicure: La Vie et la Passion de Dodin-Bouffant, Gourmet
  • Author: Marcel Rouff
  • ISBN: 9780375760808
  • Page: 380
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the classic French novel The Passionate Epicure, Marcel Rouff introduces Dodin Bouffant, a character based loosely on Anthelme Brillat Savarin, an infamous bachelor and epicure dedicated to the high arts the art of food and the art of love This edition contains a Preface by Lawrence Durrell and a new Intro duction by Jeffrey Steingarten, the food critic for Vogue magaIn the classic French novel The Passionate Epicure, Marcel Rouff introduces Dodin Bouffant, a character based loosely on Anthelme Brillat Savarin, an infamous bachelor and epicure dedicated to the high arts the art of food and the art of love This edition contains a Preface by Lawrence Durrell and a new Intro duction by Jeffrey Steingarten, the food critic for Vogue magazine and author of the bestselling book The Man Who Ate Everything.

    One thought on “The Passionate Epicure: La Vie et la Passion de Dodin-Bouffant, Gourmet”

    1. Before there was Ruth Reichl, even before Elizabeth David and A.J. Liebling, there was Marcel Rouff. La vie et la passion de Dodin-Bouffant is a hymn to French food. I veered between uncontrolled drooling (at the descriptions of the food) and cringing horror (at the sheer quantities consumed in one sitting). If you like watching the domestic goddess, or if Babette's Feast is your favourite movie, you'll love this book. If you've ever eaten a dish and felt your senses expand the way it does befor [...]

    2. Perfect little vignettes on the life of a true gourmand. If nothing else, reading the described menus makes one want to relearn the lost art - not of complicated, detailed, fiddly French cooking, but of understanding how to balance subtle, nuanced, complex flavours against each other to compose menus that titillate, soothe and delight simultaneously. Overall, a charming, is terribly verbose read.

    3. A light but pleasant confection, loosely inspired by the life of Brillat-Savarin, famous author of "La physiology du goût". Rouff, however, takes several liberties with his model: Dodin-Bouffant only leaves his home town to take the waters once at Baden-Baden, under strict orders from his doctor, and hates everything about the experience, whereas Brillat-Savarin travelled quite widely, all the way to New York (albeit involuntarily, since he had to flee during the French Revolution). Dodin-Bouff [...]

    4. Really a great read. Language and word choice is from the 1850s and so is exquisitely specific about food. Only Ruskin could write about the visual arts with this depth

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