Sir Malcolm and the Missing Prince: A Tale of Long Ago

Sir Malcolm and the Missing Prince A Tale of Long Ago Young Prince Hubert is incorrigible unmanageable and tiresomely demanding What is the good King to do How will his selfish Prince ever learn to rule the kingdom well His most trusted friend Sir Mal

  • Title: Sir Malcolm and the Missing Prince: A Tale of Long Ago
  • Author: Sidney Baldwin
  • ISBN: 9781584741541
  • Page: 363
  • Format: None
  • Young Prince Hubert is incorrigible, unmanageable, and tiresomely demanding What is the good King to do How will his selfish Prince ever learn to rule the kingdom well His most trusted friend, Sir Malcolm, has a plan Prince Hubert is swept away to a land where he is simply known as Hugh, a peasant boy His silks are replaced with rough work clothes, his castle dwellingYoung Prince Hubert is incorrigible, unmanageable, and tiresomely demanding What is the good King to do How will his selfish Prince ever learn to rule the kingdom well His most trusted friend, Sir Malcolm, has a plan Prince Hubert is swept away to a land where he is simply known as Hugh, a peasant boy His silks are replaced with rough work clothes, his castle dwelling with a humble cottage It is here that Hugh learns valuable life lessons from the widow of the forest.Hugh is a sturdy, likable boy who will undoubtedly take a favorite place in the line of lovable Lamplighter characters.

    One thought on “Sir Malcolm and the Missing Prince: A Tale of Long Ago”

    1. This was the first Lamplighter Theatre radio drama that I listened to. I hesitantly borrowed it from my church's library after the librarian highly recommended it, thinking that it would be just another prince-kingom-fantasy-allegory, which I'm not really into.Boy, was I wrong.Not only was it not fantasy, it was an amazing moral story! It also included one of my favorite radio actors (Adam Wylie), who played as Hubert/Hugh. And I love Jess Harnell (Finnian Jones).Lamplighter has definitely expan [...]

    2. Dad is reading this book to Ellie at night and they are loving it. She has listened to the audio. We gave this book to Ellie in celebration of her devotion to the Lord.This was such a precious book for Dad and Ellie to read together. They both rated it 5 stars. One of the characters in the book is Ellie and the prince gave her a gold coin that she wore around her neck. We had a gold coin with an angel on it that Yellow Grandma had given us so Ben put a small hole in the top of it and hung it on [...]

    3. We listened to this in the car. We really enjoyed this story and have already listened to it twice. This is an excellent story for boys to hear, especially ones that would prefer to play all day or think work is beneath them or think others are here to serve them. Actually it is a good reminder for all. My son really enjoyed it even with the strong moral teaching. The audio theater was done well.

    4. Such a worthwhile read for the family. Our kids were 5 and 4 when we read it aloud, but it is suitable for a much older audience, too. It pricked my heart over and over. We plan to read it every few years.

    5. Actually we are listening to the audio theatre--Great story! I love lamplighter books and their audio theatre is wonderful. Elijah especially loved this. I look forward to downloading another when there is a good sale. It is worth the expense.

    6. This is such a great story. Near the end I was really moved by the changes in him. We will read this again for sure.

    7. FANTASTIC children's book. My kids and I were on the edge of our seats for the entire book. A memorable lesson on character building.

    8. We read this together as a family and it was a great book. We thoroughly enjoyed the story - a bratty prince who comes to learn what it really takes to rule others.

    9. A spoiled prince is whisked to the country side to live as a poor boy in the care of a peasant woman. Will poverty teach him honor?

    10. Some Lamplighters can have the "preachy" overwhelm the story but this one is pretty good--an easy read, involving story, but still a good message.

    11. Say you took a morality fable by Aesop, stretched it to the length of a novella, gave it a faux-medieval setting, sprinkled it with Victorian sentimentality, and worked in a few quotations from Proverbs at the end. What you’ve made isn’t harmful, but it’s not children’s lit either.

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