Rednecks and Bluenecks: The Politics of Country Music

Rednecks and Bluenecks The Politics of Country Music An up close and personal take on country music s vast political discord Just so you know we re ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks March

  • Title: Rednecks and Bluenecks: The Politics of Country Music
  • Author: Chris Willman
  • ISBN: 9781595580177
  • Page: 436
  • Format: Hardcover
  • An up close and personal take on country music s vast political discord Just so you know, we re ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks, March 2003 You ll be sorry that you messed with the U.S of A Cuz we ll put a boot in your assIt s the American way from Courtesy of the Red, White, Blue The Angry AmericanAn up close and personal take on country music s vast political discord Just so you know, we re ashamed the president of the United States is from Texas Natalie Maines of the Dixie Chicks, March 2003 You ll be sorry that you messed with the U.S of A Cuz we ll put a boot in your assIt s the American way from Courtesy of the Red, White, Blue The Angry American by Toby KeithOn the eve of America s invasion of Iraq, the Dixie Chicks went from being the leading lights of country music to heartland pariahs, thanks to one Bush bashing aside on a London stage A year later, the list of entertainers stumping for Dubya consisted almost exclusively of country stars such as Brooks Dunn, Lee Ann Womack, and Travis Tritt How did the erstwhile music of the rural working class come to be the music of choice of the GOP In Rednecks and Bluenecks, Entertainment Weekly senior writer Chris Willman looks at the way country s increasing popularity and conservative drift parallel the transformation of the Democratic South into the heart of the Republican mainstream Meanwhile, for all those Steve Earle souls trapped in Toby Keith counties, alt country has emerged as a refuge for the loyal opposition Written with intelligence and wit, Rednecks and Bluenecks makes clear that country and its offshoots represent a strain of American culture where a passionate political debate is taking place.Original interviews with artists including The Dixie Chicks, Toby Keith, Steve Earle, Brooks Dunn, Willie Nelson, Roseanne Cash, Travis Tritt, Rodney Crowell, Kris Kristofferson, Gretchen Wilson, Lee Ann Womack, Ricky Skaggs, Linda Ronstadt, Nanci Griffith, Alan Jackson, Sara Evans, Tim McGraw, Buddy Miller, Drive By Truckers.

    One thought on “Rednecks and Bluenecks: The Politics of Country Music”

    1. his book is a fascinating look at the political makeup of the stars and establishment of country music. Working both forward and backward from the Dixie Chicks' scandal, Willman interviews a whole host of musicians, songwriters, and other country music types to get their takes on where the country music establishment falls on the political spectrum.Unsurprisingly, most everyone agrees that the majority of mainstream country acts are conservative, while the majority of alt-country/Americana acts [...]

    2. This was a fascinating read. Willman did a fine job interviewing country music heavy-hitters from both sides of the political fence (Rodney Crowell, Kris Kristofferson, Ronnie Dunn, Toby Keith, etc.). Country music is big business today, and the 'boot up your ass' mentality is one of the reasons I don't listen to a lot of current country radio. Today's general public assumes that country music artists are naturally drawn toward the conservative side, and when they 'get out of line', those audien [...]

    3. This book was ok. It had several really interesting chapters on the relationship between country music and the two political parties, especially how Democrats seem to have abandoned the mainstream country music audience. And of course I'm going to love any book that has an interview with Patterson Hood from the Drive-By Truckers.But sometimes it seemed a little repetitive. And being an academic it bugged me when he uncritically reported stuff that I know simply isn't true or is way more complex [...]

    4. I read this basically because I love the Dixie Chicks, especially since they got in trouble for being outspoken.It sort of extends to the conflict that I really like country music, and I'm a flaming commie pinko liberal (well, really green anarchist, but whatev) which often feels like a conflict.I didn't particularly adore the writing style, but I found it interesting the whole way through. Lots of stuff I didn't know before.

    5. Not a bad read, even if it was written by a guy who works for Entertainment Weekly. It was a bit fluffy, but still seemed to give a good overview of both sides and the middle of politics in country music.

    6. Learned a lot about the history of country music and alt country. Also learned a lot about the politics that go with it

    7. I don't always like Willman's writing--it's a bit over the top. There are some great stories here (particularly about Steve Earle and Toby Keith), but I'm still not sure what Willman's point is.

    8. I thoroughly enjoyed this book's romp through the political affiliations, quagmires, and musicology of country music over the years.

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