In Lieu of Flowers: A Conversation for the Living

In Lieu of Flowers A Conversation for the Living Grieving is as natural as breathing for if we have lived and loved surely we will grieve Nancy Cobb meets death in the most vital of places in the lives of everyday people and in doing so has found

  • Title: In Lieu of Flowers: A Conversation for the Living
  • Author: Nancy Cobb
  • ISBN: 9780375714481
  • Page: 427
  • Format: Paperback
  • Grieving is as natural as breathing, for if we have lived and loved, surely we will grieve Nancy Cobb meets death in the most vital of places in the lives of everyday people and in doing so has found a way to infuse this darkest subject with light Her candor and refreshing perspective make the deaths of those she has loved and death itself a subject to explore rat Grieving is as natural as breathing, for if we have lived and loved, surely we will grieve Nancy Cobb meets death in the most vital of places in the lives of everyday people and in doing so has found a way to infuse this darkest subject with light Her candor and refreshing perspective make the deaths of those she has loved and death itself a subject to explore rather than to avoid Cobb s personal experiences become a point of departure for what amounts to a longer conversation about loss In telling stories about encounters with grief, Cobb opens us up to our own experiences, and she encourages us to accept and honor the divine intersections where the living meet the dying.

    One thought on “In Lieu of Flowers: A Conversation for the Living”

    1. A friend sent this to me as a gift last week. I found the book to be comforting. It also gives suggestions on how to most help family and friend's who have lost a loved one. "Affirmations come and go, in a variety of forms, at the end of life. In a sense, it is time for the dying to "take their moment" and whether their feelings are spoken or unspoken, it is the time for the living to pay very close attention. Hospice workers say that hearing is the last sense to go. The "tricky" part for the li [...]

    2. i don't know can't put my finger on it besides another attempt to avoid God to promote these false, blasphemous beliefs following death is some attempt to comfortexcerpts i dog eard the page for;A mourner is, perforce, a person with a story. The pity is, how very rarely it gets told. Christian McEwenif we're all going to die, why can't we talk about death?Death is as sacred and inevitable, as ordinary and extraordinary, as messy and complex, as birth, and yet end-of-life care in America is only [...]

    3. I know I'm in the minority here, but I really did not enjoy this book nor did I find it helpful at a time of tremendous sadness and loss in my life. The author and most of the people in her life come off as extremely pretentious and disingenuous.

    4. Rich and delightful, this comforting tome forges a connection between life and death, between those who've passed and the loved ones they leave behind. With charm and poetic lilt, Nancy Cobb returns the experience of death to its rightful place as an ordinary, inevitable time of transition.

    5. This was a very insightful book about grieving and loss of loved ones. A comforting book. The author has described events in a very loving way. I enjoyed it and would recommend it for anyone who has lost a loved one.

    6. I read this book not long after my father passed away. It was so wonderful in talking about grief and how even though someone may be gone from your daily life, they are still with you in other ways. I tell other people who are grieving to read it all the time.

    7. The Introduction was the best part and really spoke to me. "After experiencing the death of someone you love, you join the rank-and-file whose number multiplies hourly."

    8. Amazing book to help anyone deal with grief. A must read for anyone who has loved and lost- espcially if you were there for the final goodbye.

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