Tour de Lovecraft - the Tales

Tour de Lovecraft the Tales Welcome to the Tour de Lovecraft The Tales This book is pretty much what that title conveys a tour through all fifty one of H P Lovecraft s mature works of prose fiction We re skipping the poetry th

  • Title: Tour de Lovecraft - the Tales
  • Author: Kenneth Hite
  • ISBN: 9780981679204
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Trade papaerback
  • Welcome to the Tour de Lovecraft The Tales This book is pretty much what that title conveys, a tour through all fifty one of H.P Lovecraft s mature works of prose fiction We re skipping the poetry, the collaborations and ghost writing and revisions except for Through the Gates of the Silver Key , the travel writing, the artistic and literary criticism and all the otheWelcome to the Tour de Lovecraft The Tales This book is pretty much what that title conveys, a tour through all fifty one of H.P Lovecraft s mature works of prose fiction We re skipping the poetry, the collaborations and ghost writing and revisions except for Through the Gates of the Silver Key , the travel writing, the artistic and literary criticism and all the other things Lovecraft wrote instead of horror stories It is my contention that the tale s the thing, and al though some of Lovecraft s other works are interesting or fun or valuable, they re not what any of us really signed up for Like most tours, we ll stay a little longer at the good spots, and try our best to hustle past the weedy, overgrown patches Hopefully I can point out one or two scenic overlooks along the way, letting you perhaps see some familiar landscape from an angle you hadn t noticed before

    One thought on “Tour de Lovecraft - the Tales”

    1. (Originally posted on flamesrising)Howard Phillips Lovecraft is one of the few authors of the horror genre who has been dissected rather thoroughly (Edgar Allen Poe being another). Kenneth Hite, who’s made much of his living as both a critic and a Lovecraft enthusiast, has a few things to say on the subject, and they make for very interesting reading. Tour de Lovecraft — the Tales is an engaging breakdown of all 51 of Lovecraft’s mature prose fiction, from 1917’s The Tomb to Lovecraft’ [...]

    2. This book was great for picking up trivia and connections between Lovecraft's stories. It's nice to have on hand as you're reading through Lovecraft (especially in a systematic fashion) and/or listening to the H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast (where I first learned about it).I gave it 4 stars for being interesting and illuminating. That said, it's not very thorough. These are Hite's observations and bits of information he's dug up, it's not meant to be an annotation and it certainly isn't one. Do [...]

    3. I am a big fan of Hite's RPG material (top 5 designers for me, easily), and I love his Ken Writes About Stuff column with Pelgrane Press, but this is less than good. It's a collection of blog entries, and that shows. Stunts like that can be pulled off (eg, Wil Wheaton), but just binding a bunch of blog entries together doesn't cut it (and that's what appears to have been done here). Beyond that, even, the writing was simply poor: meandering (and not in the good James Joyce way), self-indulging ( [...]

    4. This is a "must read" for those interested in the fifty-one major tales (sans revisions, with the exception of "Through the Gate of the Silver Key") by H.P. Lovecraft. Yes, this is an edited collection of what began as blog posts. Yes, the entries are far too casual, brief, and unstructured to be considered scholarship. That said, Kenneth Hite's little volume packs more of a punch than many books triple its size. Hite not only responds to the texts but also engages some of the chief scholarly po [...]

    5. A fun, casual little companion to H.P. Lovecraft's fiction, I read game designer and writer Kenneth Hite's "Tour de Lovecraft" (published originally on Live Journal) alongside Lovecraft's "Complete Fiction." Hite's essays on each tale, highlighting themes and sharing his opinion on these works, what makes them work or fail for him. While not deeply literary, Hite sparks thought and has a witty and entertaining voice especially when debating the opinions of other critics such as S.T. Joshi or Rob [...]

    6. Many good ideas and interesting observations. Unfortunately, only rarely did they extend beyond the sketchy, blunt opinion and idea into actual arguments. That's a real shame, because that subtracts from Hite's (often) non-Joshi stance. This simply remains too amateurish, and not at all even the least scholarly.That said, it was entertaining, an easy read, and Hite had very good points now and then (like why the witch in "The Dreams in the Witch-House" is afraid of a cross, even though HPL was a [...]

    7. Hite provides a chatty, casual guide to fifty-one of Lovecraft's prose works, most of which get only a page or two of light synopsis and reflection spiced with trivia. Almost more interesting is Hite's survey of Lovecraftian criticism, which provides a context for how HPL's work has been viewed over the last century. No serious Lovecraft fan will be surprised by any of the content here, but it's an entertaining enough read, and a decent intro for any one new to the joys of non-Euclidean geometry [...]

    8. If you could sit at a Chicago bar and listen to Kenneth Hite talk Lovecraft, it would sound like this. That's some of the highest praise I can offer.An acquaintance of mine who's spent considerable more time with Ken than I've been blessed with describes him as "no matter where you are, the smartest guy in the room." That's fully on display as Ken runs through the Lovecraft canon, gives opinions, and potshots sacred cows.It's the criticisms that are the unexpected gold. I mean, this is Ken Hite; [...]

    9. Kenneth Hite knows his Lovecraft. He very opinionated and and you won't always agree with him (He thinks the oft anthologized The Outsider is one of Lovecraft's worst stories, he does make a good argument), but he hits the nail on the head more often than not. He also has some good insight on cheerleader's and detractor's of Lovecraft's work.Other than those of us that want to devour all things Lovecraft, I'm not sure who would like this other than those trying to pick up just the cream of Lovec [...]

    10. It is a very opinionated and moderately idiosyncratic commentary on Lovecraft's fiction. It avoids most of his collaborations ("Under the Pyramids/Imprisoned with the Pharaohs" and ""Through the Gates of the Silver Key" are the exceptions, and I am not sure whether the former even counts as a collaboration), and focuses on giving a sold sense of the author's reactions to the story, leavened with a bit of history and a glimpse at other critical reactions. There are not plot summaries. If you enjo [...]

    11. Entertaining opinions. It's a great book if you've read enough Lovecraft to know you love his writing, and are looking for a guide to the greater corpus. His thoughts on the worst stories are much more interesting than the better ones, and I admire him for standing up to Joshi re: the witch-house. I do wish though that he didn't assume prior enthusiasm for role playing games. I think this was written when he was purely a figure in those circle, but I personally found him via the game-free "HP Lo [...]

    12. A good overview of Lovecraft's works from an expert on the subject. Somewhat of a specialist read, but I enjoyed it, even though we don't always agree.unsweet-tea-no-lemon.

    13. What have I learned? That it's been too long since I read some Lovecraft. More systematic and rooted in broader knowledge, yet less compellingly written than Houllebecq's study.

    14. An interesting analysis of the evolution of Lovecraft's writing from the masterful pen of gaming legend Kenneth Hite.

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