September 11: An Oral History

September An Oral History About people lost their lives in the terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington D C on September Thousands narrowly escaped their survival a result of eerily prescient spur of

  • Title: September 11: An Oral History
  • Author: Dean E. Murphy Patricia Ryan
  • ISBN: 9780385507684
  • Page: 192
  • Format: Hardcover
  • About 3,000 people lost their lives in the terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C on September 11, 2001 Thousands narrowly escaped, their survival a result of eerily prescient spur of the moment decisions, acts of superhuman courage, the unfailing kindness of strangers, and, in some cases, fortuitous strokes of luck September 11 An Oral History unAbout 3,000 people lost their lives in the terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, D.C on September 11, 2001 Thousands narrowly escaped, their survival a result of eerily prescient spur of the moment decisions, acts of superhuman courage, the unfailing kindness of strangers, and, in some cases, fortuitous strokes of luck September 11 An Oral History unites the voices of that day It is at once a dramatic reminder of one of the most devastating events in history of the nation and a tribute to the spirit of cooperation and the outpourings of empathy that marked that day for so many people in the United States and abrad Written and compiled by Dean E Murphy, who covered the attacks on the World Trade Center for the New York Times, September 11 An Oral History presents vivid eyewitness accounts by those who rushed to the scene, as well as the stories of people around the country and abroad who watched as events unfolded on television and waited for news of friends, family, and acquaintances.A priest who runs an adoption center near the WTC paints an unforgettable portrait of what he calls the meeting place of Hell and Earth that morning a businessman from Los Angeles in New York to conduct a training seminar recounts in breathstopping detail his descent with a blind colleague from the 78th floor of the North Tower a senior at a high school the owners of a small business in Arkansas describe their thoughts and feelings as they waited to hear from a customer who had become part of their lives though they had never actually met him and a civilian employee at the Pentagon recalls giving up hope in a smoke filled office, her hair on fire, only to be led to safety by the soothing voice of a colleague Contributions from firefighters, police, and military personnel, and other rescue workers demonstrate the mixture of professionalism and humanity that justly elevated them, despite their own modesty, to the status of national heroes There are stories, too, of those who narrowly missed being part of the mayhem including a family of four who changed their plane reservations from one of the hijacked jets and others whose arrivals at work were delayed by unlikely coincidences and quirks of fate like forgetting to turn on the coffeepot the night before.The first and only oral history of September 11 that presents people from all walks of life, these poignant, often harrowing vignettes capture the grief, rage, and fear that gripped the nationj and offer an intimate, inspiring look at the strengths that enabled us to move on.From the Hardcover edition.

    One thought on “September 11: An Oral History”

    1. My 2002 S.F. Chronicle review:We all did a lot of forgetting last fall. There was simply no other way. Days or weeks or even months of immersion in the shock of Sept. 11 had to give way, eventually, to turning away from that inner pain and bewilderment so many of us felt. Now it's time to turn back. We all have to decide how -- and what - - we want to remember. The huge crop of books now being published about the Sept. 11 attacks -- four of which are considered here -- serve to reproduce that si [...]

    2. This was really powerful. Before this, I'd read two others from the catastrophe-told-by-witnesses genre, Underground by Haruki Murakami, and Voices from Chernobyl: The Oral History of a Nuclear Disaster by Svetlana Alexievich. Writing-wise, I'd have to rank Underground highest, because it included analysis by the author as well. But this one hit so close to home, I think in part because I was 11 when 9/11 happened, and I've never really felt a personal connection until reading these stories. Hig [...]

    3. While I found this book to be a very intimate and extremely raw account of what happened in New York City on September 11, I had to give it three stars because, in my opinion, failed to properly address the other events that occurred on that day. There is a small segment at the very end of the book about the attack on the Pentagon, and the events that took place in Pennsylvania aren't addressed at all. There is absolutely nothing said about Flight 93. In my opinion, this was a huge flaw in the w [...]

    4. Even over nine years after 9/11, this book was emotionally draining to read. We read about people who made it down 60-70 flights of stairs, one man who narrowly averted disaster by forgetting to set his coffee maker the night before, and most disturbingly, one rescue worker who had a conversation with a person, who by some quirk of nature such as an air draft, survived the 1,000 foot fall even though only her head, shoulder, and one lung were left undamaged. We also read about people's experienc [...]

    5. A series of first-person accounts from survivors of the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center, where the reader finds out that life or death are sometime determined by small details, such making the random choice to go through one particular door or down a particular staircase, or just being late to work by a couple of minutes.

    6. This book is a collection of eyewitness accounts of 9/11, organized by the location of the person on that day. Truly amazing!Common Core Standard: Analyze how individuals, ideas, and events affect complex events and sequences in informational text. Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem and the source text.

    7. It seems inappropriate to review this book, even if I could figure out how to do it. Except for a few brief paragraphs recounting the timeline of that terrible morning, the book consists in its entirety of survivors' and witnesses' personal stories. What is there to say to that?

    8. The stories from these individuals who survived that day are amazing and bring about every emotion possible.

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