Dyschronia

Dyschronia One morning the residents of a small coastal town somewhere in Australia wake to discover the sea has disappeared One among them has been plagued by troubling visions of this cataclysm for years Is s

  • Title: Dyschronia
  • Author: Jennifer Mills
  • ISBN: 9781760552206
  • Page: 432
  • Format: Paperback
  • One morning, the residents of a small coastal town somewhere in Australia wake to discover the sea has disappeared One among them has been plagued by troubling visions of this cataclysm for years Is she a prophet Does she have a disorder that alters her perception of time Or is she a gifted and compulsive liar Mills novel takes contemporary issues of resource depletiOne morning, the residents of a small coastal town somewhere in Australia wake to discover the sea has disappeared One among them has been plagued by troubling visions of this cataclysm for years Is she a prophet Does she have a disorder that alters her perception of time Or is she a gifted and compulsive liar Mills novel takes contemporary issues of resource depletion and climate change and welds them to one young woman s migraine inducing nightmares Her prevision anticipates a world where entire communities are left to fend for themselves economically drained, socially fractured, trapped between a hardscrabble past and an uncertain future Oscillating between the future and the past, Dyschronia is a novel that tantalises and dazzles, as one woman s prescient nightmares become entangled with her town s uncertain fate Blazing with questions of consciousness, trust, and destiny, this is a wildly imaginative and extraordinary novel from award winning author Jennifer Mills.

    One thought on “Dyschronia”

    1. Review to come.In the meantime: some sincerely beautiful and raw and dreamy and tangible writing here. It's not what you would call plot driven, but it doesn't exactly fall into character driven, either it's somewhere in between. The story takes places across three different times within the same small (fictional) Australian town.The opening chapter is actually the start of one timeline, but 8+ years after the other timelines, and near the end we get to discover stuff from right back at the begi [...]

    2. A haunting, circular tale that loops between timelines in a small Australian town. Some beautiful writing centered on a strong sense of place.The novel operates within three timelines: two of which are from Sam's POV, the third from the remaining townspeople's POV, the collective 'we' who narrate the post-disaster present. There is something Kafka-esque about their dealings with bureaucracy, machinations in which private corporations move in, holdings pass hands, town investors receive mysteriou [...]

    3. I love the way this book is imagined. For instance, time doesn't just have speed, it has weight. A young child accepts that she seen things that NOW hasn't quite caught up with. Once surprise at its narrative world wore off in the second half of the novel, perhaps it could have moved more quickly to its conclusion.

    4. This book was provided toFarrago,the student magazine of the University of Melbourne as a media release by Picador, the review is also available on the website. Link provided below.Lyrically Looming, Jennifer Mills’ Dyschronia. Jennifer Mills: DyschroniaPicador by Pan Macmillan Australia, 2018BN 9781760552206, pp. 357, $29.99 “Here’s a prediction: the future never turns out the way we think it will. Simple enough, but that’s not the end of it. The past isn’t what we thought it was eith [...]

    5. A bleak and intriguing climate dystopia, about greed, small towns and the inevitable destruction of our environment that's coming at us while we all pretend it's not. I sometimes struggled to keep the three different threads of the story untangled in my brain, but loved some stylistic approaches (like the collective narration of sections from the town's perspective) and found the whole book very powerful.

    6. Incredible. Devastating. a poetic and yearning critique of industry, capitalism, greed, and people's passive belief in life going on. Amazing split narrative between the collective and the individual, and the precarious and random movements of time in individual consciousness and the earth's life. A definite dose of climate change anxiety that I had to slow down reading in order to process. A tour de force.

    7. I picked this up because I liked the cover and really enjoyed it, even though it features time travel (of a sorts) which is not my favorite thing. It's post-apocalyptic (kind of), set in Australia, with a shifting timeline and point-of-view. Once the timelines of the points-of-view started merging, it was easier to follow - but the difficulty in following the timeline is part of the point. An interesting take on the future we're headed for if we don't curb global warming and resource exploitatio [...]

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