Radiator Days

Radiator Days A collection of journal comics by popular cartoonist Lucy Knisley I used to live in a small apaertment in Chicago where the radiator hummed noisily while i drew comics The comics in this book were ma

  • Title: Radiator Days
  • Author: Lucy Knisley
  • ISBN: 9780979882852
  • Page: 304
  • Format: Paperback
  • A collection of journal comics by popular cartoonist Lucy Knisley.I used to live in a small apaertment in Chicago, where the radiator hummed noisily while i drew comics The comics in this book were made over a two year period that seems to consist of constant winter They were drawn to the tune of the radiator s hum.

    One thought on “Radiator Days”

    1. I liked Knisley's Relish best. I also have read French MilK and her other memoirs and travelogues and I am attracted to her artistic style. Sort of seduced by the color and flair. This book is a collection of early black and white stuff from when she was living in Chicago, when it was too cold (for her! Hey, I am in Chicago and like it!) and she drew to the accompanying sound of the radiator. Her work is fresh and attractive at this point, even if rough sometimes. Of course she gets better at ev [...]

    2. Warning, there is full frontal male nudity. (Good for you, Knisley.)A graphic novel / memoir from Knisley’s days as an art student. The book is a collection of non-fiction, creative non-fiction, and fiction short stories, some deeply personal, others just goofing around as she experiments with art and storytelling styles. Favorite part for me was to watch her seriously fangirl out when she met her hero, Lynda Barry, author of ‘One Hundred Demons.’As a reader, picking up and reading Knisley [...]

    3. I really love Lucy Knisley's illustrations, and for the most part - I really enjoyed this book. I only give 3 stars due to the haphazard nature in which these comic were put together. I know that's supposed to be the whole "sketchbook" feel, but I think the comics could have been arranged more cohesively. Also, 5 stars for all autobiographical comics, and the rest - eh. Still recommend checking it out! And I would also like to give it a re-read. I repeat, her illustrations are totally awesome.

    4. As a fan of Lucy Knisley, I sought this out specifically. It appears to be self published and functions as a collection of comics from right before she graduated college until sometime in grad school. A page at the beginning of the book explains that she lived in an apartment with a loud radiator during this time, hence the name, but it sounded like she moved states during this period so I'm confused about which location had the loud radiator. It's so unimportant but it's something I kept trying [...]

    5. I am rating this 1 star, because according to GoodReads, that means "I did not like it". And I really did not.I have read many graphic novel memoir type books, and enjoyed nearly all of them. So I understand the diary aspect, I get the genre. But I did not like this book. I think to enjoy any memoir, you must to some extent enjoy and appreciate the writer. I've read 2 other books by Lucy Knisley, and I guess I just don't like her. I did enjoy Relish, but that book is rather different than this o [...]

    6. I liked the personal journaling stuff but didn't like the fiction at all. In general it would have benefitted from more of a structure. It felt like she just dumped everything she drew in those years and put it in a book.This is my third book by Lucy Knisley and I have to admit I only really loved one of them. But since it was the latest, I can only hope it means she's getting better and better? I do like her website stuff. Anyway, will probably give An Age of License: A Travelogue a try anyway. [...]

    7. "Is this about art school?" he asked with disdain, barely holding the book as if it would infect him with something nasty. "Well, she does go to art school, but I wouldn't say it's ABOUT art school. It's more 'slice of life' than that. Windows into her world. Some of those windows look in on school." He flipped it open to a random page. "This is about critiques." He looked at me pointedly, as if he had won something, caught me in a lie that indeed the book was nothing but art school nonsense. It [...]

    8. I've read a bunch of Lucy's other stuff, so it was fun to go back and look at work from earlier in her career! This is a collection of autobio comics from her last year of college, summer spent working as a cheese monger, and her time in graduate school. There are lots of gems, like the little comic about the personalities she assigns to the cheeses or the little fiction story about the bridesmaids that get trapped in the elevator. It's light hearted for the most part; another fun, charming, laz [...]

    9. Lucy was at Quimby's last night and even though this book was published some years ago probably, I had this idea she was still in Vermont, so when she said, Hi I'm Lucy, I was like, oh, she's not in Vermont, and it took me a second to wonder if I should be like, Heyyy, I was just reading your book and I like it, etc. I don't think I communicated it well, but for the record—I like it. I am adding it to my how-to-be-23 reading list.

    10. An early collection of her short comics accomplished while she was living in Chicago before heading to her Master's degree. I liked her R-rates comics! V sexual, but she always talks about thinking about sex a lot, so it was great to see that realized in her art. Very haphazard collection, though. Not a true narrative arc, though I think they were chronologically ordered? Not sure. She's figuring out her voice & style still, and it's a really cool journey to bring your reader on.

    11. Having read French Milk I already knew I liked how Lucy Knisley interpretated her life through comic style images, so this time to get a taste of her combining multiple styles, and a variety of short stories was really cool. She's a person I think most people could connect easily with on some level, I know I definitely have similarities to her, and how she thinks in particular.

    12. Couldn't finish it.This details her times in Chicago as an art student so I was excited to get the perspective of someone who grow up in NYC and now lives in Chicago. Unfortunately she rarely spoke about Chicago. It is a collection of random stories and diary entries. I still enjoy her inner monologues, but the sex parts in this book led me to just stop reading it.

    13. a bit of a mish-mash. fortunately, i really like knisley art, which made the less-impressive vignettes tolerable.

    14. This reminded a little bit of "Girls." In that it was a lot about millennial post graduate anxiety. Also being a girl can be tough. Also food service is the WORST!

    15. For a long-time reader and fan of Lucy Knisley's work like myself, it's very interesting to see the themes and evolution of her art style through the years. Radiator Days collects many of Lucy Knisley's early work (some from 2007 and before), and it's nice to see how some of the seeds for her currently published books (such as Displacement and Relish) have been planted so long ago, and how she has evolved as a storyteller and artist. Definitely a must-read for fans of her work!

    16. Very different from the other Knisley I've read. Really a series of strips with some touchstones with the novels. More graphic and less developed than the later works.

    17. This is a mish-mash of comics from Lucy's art school days and beyond. It gives us an informal glimpse into her life then, typos and all, and I found it interesting!

    18. Fun to see some of Lucy's early work. Her core style is already there, even if the subject matter is somewhat more R rated than her more recent work.

    19. I liked it! I just don't think I'm the correct audience. Better suited for folks in their early to mid twenties.

    20. In one of the first chapters of this book, the author wonders "Could my longing for validation of fame be the whim of an only child, a spoiled brat who yearns to be the center of attention all of the time? Could it?"The answer, apparently, is yes, and sadly it permeates every single page of this book.I am not against autobiography books, but I do have a simple argument that every single graphic novelist should ask themselves before attempting to do one: Is there something in my life worth talkin [...]

    21. Lucy Knisley is one of my favorite young artists. She has a way of looking at the world and instantly making you feel like you're a part of the scenes that she depicts, even if you weren't there or really have no idea what's going on. She has the ability to quickly get to the heart of the matter and show warmth in humor, even if it's a low point in what she's showcasing. In this book Lucy shares with us short comics from a two year period, and in the dedication shares that many of them were draw [...]

    22. Part journal, part fiction the stories have a nice mix. On the whole i think i preferred the journal-type comics, because they gave me more of a sense of the author, why she drew these comics and what she herself was getting out of it. I particularly liked the comics covering one day, with two panels per hour, as well as the ‘Summer Journals’ which covered a couple of months, a one-page comic a day. The fictitious comics ranged from sweet and serious to bizarre and funny. The ones that stick [...]

    23. One year ago, I bought this book at the Printer's Row Lit Festival in Chicago. Lucy Knisley, the author, happened to be there and signed the book for me. I'm sorry it took me this long to read the book because it was delightful. The concept behind the book is that it contains drawings and cartoons Lucy did while sitting by her noisy radiator in her Chicago apartment. So the comics in here are not part of a unified story, but there are some small tales here and there. I liked the comics best when [...]

    24. This was a fun and diverse collection of short comics, including diary strips, fictional vignettes, and sketches representing several years of Lucy Knisley's career. Here, Knisley really demonstrates her ability to draw comics in a variety of styles, from the stylized, to the cartoonish, to the more realistic. Her writing is equal parts humorous and relateable, with witty asides that I found highly amusing, though none of the variety comic experiments last too long. The seeds of Kinsley's later [...]

    25. Cute, if a bit simplistic. These are really mostly diary entries and comic doodles from during her time in undergrad art school, so there's a lot of early-twenties existential angst about grad school and career fears, which thank goodness I can relate to in the past tense. Some comics seem like school assignment filler, while others are genuinely sweet and make me really connect with the author and like her a great deal. Whatever, anybody who ships Jeeves/Wooster while daydreaming is ok in my bo [...]

    26. I enjoyed most of this collection of Lucy Knisley's early comics, drawn during her time studying at the Art Institute of Chicago and working as a cheesemonger at Fox & Obel. The cartoons in the middle got a bit porny, which gave me a rude awakening! And there was a lot of Lucy's typical 20-something existential crises about getting older (please!), wasting time and not knowing if all her efforts will come to fruition. The stand-out comic was the beautiful 50-pager about a secondhand bookshop [...]

    27. I don't think the subject matter of these comics is all that exciting (a collection of comics she created while attending art school in Chicago) but I just really adore her style of drawing. I also love that I'd be reading along and turn the page and BAM! there's a penis! Kept me entertained, although I'm bummed a friend burst my bubble and told me Fox & Obel is closed. Lucy's experience working at their cheese counter made me curious to visit the shop.

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