Attila: The Judgement

Attila The Judgement AD the future of the world hangs in the balance The once mighty Roman Empire lies open and vulnerable to attack from a huge Hunnish army that has gathered on the banks of the Danube and is poised

  • Title: Attila: The Judgement
  • Author: William Napier
  • ISBN: 9780752893907
  • Page: 351
  • Format: Paperback
  • AD 449 the future of the world hangs in the balance The once mighty Roman Empire lies open and vulnerable to attack from a huge Hunnish army that has gathered on the banks of the Danube and is poised and ready to strike but only one man has seen the danger.Master General Aetius knows Attila still thirsts for blood and destruction, but he is helpless to stop the the penAD 449 the future of the world hangs in the balance The once mighty Roman Empire lies open and vulnerable to attack from a huge Hunnish army that has gathered on the banks of the Danube and is poised and ready to strike but only one man has seen the danger.Master General Aetius knows Attila still thirsts for blood and destruction, but he is helpless to stop the the pending onslaught For Atilla plans to march on the mighty city of Rome, the very heart of the empire but is the risk too high, even for the most battle hardened of warlords Attila s choices play out on the plains Europe where he must ultimately face his destiny.

    One thought on “Attila: The Judgement”

    1. Sve u svemu svidjela mi se cijela triologija. Opisi opsade i bitaka su izvrsni i realistični i uživala sam je čitati. Ne mogu tražiti puno više od toga u povijesnoj fikciji. Dobro napravljeno.

    2. Spotty trilogy. From me it’s been four stars—five stars—two stars. But I gave one star free to the first for potential, and perhaps I rob a star from the third for dissatisfaction. Late in this book, very late, we see into Attila’s mind: by that time he’s defeated and mad. Until then we don’t. No inspirational speeches, as in the second; nothing until mad speeches in the lead-up to his death. Until then he directs a war but he doesn’t talk to us. Our first passage of his thoughts i [...]

    3. Los tres libros son una maravilla. Pese a que al empezar, ya se sabe por cultura general que Atila no fue ningún santo, el autor se las arregla para generar sentimientos positivos hacia el personaje, logrando que en ciertos momentos el lector desee verlo victorioso, para luego en el ultimo libro darle un giro a los puntos de vista y así mostrarnos al personaje tal y como lo recuerda la historia. El autor nos muestra también el lado decadente de Roma y sus múltiples "pecados". El tercer libro [...]

    4. This is the final installment in 'Napier's trilogy on one of the most famous non-Roman historical figures. It starts off reasonably well enough with the siege of Viminacium, a legionary fortress though one which is nevertheless incredibly provincial in comparison to what it would have been like at the apogee of Roman might.Napier's sporadically used abilities for deep characterisation are at their most evidenced for the characters who feature predominantly in this part of the story - though a nu [...]

    5. -Remate trepidante, fogoso y sangriento a la trilogía.-Género. Novela Histórica.Lo que nos cuenta. Sin que nadie se haya dado cuenta, los hunos han atravesado la frontera noreste del Imperio Romano y su asalto sobre Margo no es más que un ejemplo de sus intenciones, que son dejar claro que la petición de Atila de la mitad del imperio no es ninguna broma. Tercer y último volumen de la trilogía Atila.¿Quiere saber más de este libro, sin spoilers? Visite:librosdeolethros/

    6. The last book of Attila's trilogy. William Napier did a very good job to close Attila's tale. Although I feel like in this last book, the writer painted Attila as if he's some sort of Antagonist, killer-freak rather than focusing on his entire personality from his boyhood until now. We can see that if only Rome didn't steal everything that is precious to Attila (one fine example is his freedom, Serena and General Stilicho), maybe we wouldn't see the murderous intent coming from Attila now. That' [...]

    7. The last book of the Attila's Triology and the longest of the three. I have to say i was really excited for this one cause the other two I really like them but sometimes it just go around in unnecessary details and it gets a little borring. On this book you have the chance to be part of the epic battle between the huns and the romans: William Naiper has this hability to make you part of this conflict and even better he makes you not to choose a side cause he is allways explain both sides.

    8. ‘Was this Attila himself?’449 CE. The final book in the Attila trilogy starts with Attila’s invasion of the Roman Empire, with his ruthless campaign of slaughter in revenge for Roman atrocities. While Attila and his warriors wreak havoc across central Europe, Valentinian in Ravenna, and Theodosius in Constantinople focus on undermining each other while relying on the able but disgraced Roman general Aëtius to save the empire.‘To think’, Aëtius murmured, shaking his head again, there [...]

    9. I asked for the story to finish strong and it did! The third installment made up for any shortcomings of the second and then some.What I really liked about this series was the depiction of Atilla; he started out as a sympathetic character with childhood trials that had you rooting for him to suceed in the first book and then the second book was about his "redemption" (for lack of better words) as he comes back from a 30 year exile to unite the tribes to form a vast host to exact his vengeance. T [...]

    10. Surprising ending to an excellent trilogy. Napier clearly subscribes to the latest research on the fall of Rome that says it fell not because of decadence, of which there was plenty, but because it was too big and too riddled with Huns, Vandals and other groups that eventually destroyed it. I liked how Napier had the hero, Aetius, and others who sought to save Rome find purpose not in saving an empire they knew was past its prime but in protecting Christianity. Interesting. Less sex this time, b [...]

    11. If you are going to write a trilogy on Attila, maybe you should stick with Attila. I couldn't really understand the big shift in point of view here. I know the tale is being told be that old guy but you can't have us on the side of Attila for two books and then make him the big bad guy for the last one. And thats what happened because I found myself siding with the Romans again. Is it because what Attila was doing was so bad? But then is he really any worst than the Romans or any invading army? [...]

    12. When they noticed, people kept asking why I was reading about Attila. It's to balance out all the Glee and Project Runway shows I have to watch. Ah, the things I do for family.Though the book is titled Attila, it began with Arapovian and Knuckles, two men in the Roman Army and later Aetius, the last of brave and honorable Roman. With Attila committing such atrocities in this book it was difficult to make him the hero. The book is bloody BLOODY. It's beautiful in its own way and it's written wond [...]

    13. Well, raising two kids certainly slowed my reading down but I finally finished. I'm a big fan of James Michener's historical novels, and now I'm a fan of William Napier too. I'm looking forward to reading more Napier after reading this great trilogy of Attila.The maps shown in the books were very helpful for following the storyline, as was the section of place names. A glossary of terms that are no longer in use is not part of the book, but would have been very helpful. I often stopped reading t [...]

    14. -Remate trepidante, fogoso y sangriento a la trilogía.-Género. Novela Histórica.Lo que nos cuenta. Sin que nadie se haya dado cuenta, los hunos han atravesado la frontera noreste del Imperio Romano y su asalto sobre Margo no es más que un ejemplo de sus intenciones, que son dejar claro que la petición de Atila de la mitad del imperio no es ninguna broma. Tercer y último volumen de la trilogía Atila.¿Quiere saber más de este libro, sin spoilers? Visite:librosdeolethros/

    15. This book stands on its own fairly well, but I read it as the final installation to the trilogy, and I'm glad I did. It was a treat to watch Mr. Napier deftly use different points of view to present the story of a man who ultimately becomes one of history's greatest sociopaths, a significant contributing factor in end of an already decaying Rome. His discussion of battle strategy and the mental costs of war were excellent, as was the character-driven view of the intrigues between the Eastern and [...]

    16. I thought this was an excellent conclusion to the Attila series. The only reason I didn't give it 5 stars was simply that the beginning really drug on and on for me! I felt that it took me a lot longer to get into this one than the other two. I honestly think that I stuck it out simply because I knew it had to get better. I am glad I did though as after the first hundred pages or so the pace did pick up and it became the book I expected it to be.All in all quite enjoyable and recommended if you [...]

    17. Terrific book! The descriptions of sieges and battles are excellent and realistic. Napier even describes the battle formations and strategies of both Romans and Huns making it clear at every stage as to what was going on. The swiftness of Attila's progress once he started his murdering campaign is phenomenal as also is the devastation he wrought as he approached and invaded Italy. However, he had a worthy opponent in the Roman general Aetius, who unfortunately was not appreciated by his debauche [...]

    18. The best book of the three in what was overall a bit of a disappointing series. I know there are the constraints imposed by history - which was pretty much a blank in my personal knowledge anyway - but there are lots of gaps: the success of this kind of books is all about those gaps. I could have done without the first two books and gone straight for a more severely edited version of this one and lost little, I think. Or read it up on .

    19. Historical fiction at its best, my kind of novel and like many that I have read like Conn Iggulden, this rank high up on my list. A pity I can't get my hands on the earlier two; as such I end up reading the last of the series. Will try and get the arlier two, then the story will complete. As it is , this can stand alone by itself, but if I can read the earlier two, then the story is complete.

    20. Overall I liked the third book in Napier's trilogy on Attila. However the ending felt like the author realized the book was going to be "too big" commercially and shortened the ending in to almost an outline. Still, I learned a lot about the last days of Rome and Attila the Hun, and enjoyed the read while I was learning. Can't ask for much more than that in historical fiction. Well done.

    21. Once again, I start a trilogy at the end, thus making it a little hard to grasp in certain area`s. Despite this it was well written and pretty historically correct throughout. Good, but not amazing, and im still not decided whether to continue and read the whole series.

    22. Desenlace de la trilogía donde las tropas de Attila atacan sucesivamente el Imperio Romano de Oriente y de Occidente, siendo derrotado por dos veces a manos de Aëtius, primero en las murallas de Constantinopla y luego en los campos Cataláunicos franceses.

    23. Brilliant! The entire Attila trilogy was an excellent read, and this last book blew me away. William Napier's masterful prose, and his ability to "show" the emotions, and characters, and images within the pages of this trilogy truly sets the bar. Best historical fiction I've ever read!

    24. Este libro se me hizo demasiado lento, se enfocó mas en el punto de vista de los romanos que en el de Atila, el autor hace rodeos excesivos, incluye muchos detalles para mi gusto innecesarios.

    25. Loved this book. Mr. Napier doesn't shy away from war's brutality or history's ironies. I highly recommend this read for anyone interested in Rome, the Huns or ancient history in general.

    26. Ripping good yarn. Maybe not historically correct in some places but good fictional base for a rapping yarn

    27. Very good! Lots of fighting, blood & gorewhich made it very different to the first two. But I was very sad to read of Attila becoming the man that everyone remembers him to be.

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