De kleur van henna

De kleur van henna Ze is vastbesloten haar kinderen alles te geven wat zij in haar Engelse jeugd nooit heeft gehad Liefde opwinding en vooral vrijheid Het is het begin van de haren zestig Ze neemt ze mee in een aftands

  • Title: De kleur van henna
  • Author: Esther Freud René Kurpershoek
  • ISBN: 9023433777
  • Page: 137
  • Format: Paperback
  • Ze is vastbesloten haar kinderen alles te geven wat zij in haar Engelse jeugd nooit heeft gehad Liefde, opwinding en vooral vrijheid Het is het begin van de haren zestig Ze neemt ze mee in een aftands autbusje en strijkt met het neer in Noord Afrika, in de oude stad Marrakesj Ze wil haar kinderen van het leven laten genieten Maar die hebben daar hun eigen idee over Ze is vastbesloten haar kinderen alles te geven wat zij in haar Engelse jeugd nooit heeft gehad Liefde, opwinding en vooral vrijheid Het is het begin van de haren zestig Ze neemt ze mee in een aftands autbusje en strijkt met het neer in Noord Afrika, in de oude stad Marrakesj Ze wil haar kinderen van het leven laten genieten Maar die hebben daar hun eigen idee over Denk je dat mamma ooit zal trouwen vragen ze zich bezorgd af, en Waar kun je snoep kopen in Marokko De moeder gaat te slotte op in het Soefisme, zodanig dat het de inwoners van Marrakesj, hoe tolerant ook jegens de stroom van vreemdelingen die hun stad als het magische centrum van de wereld beleven, enigszins bevreemd De twee kinderen zoeken houvast bij hun oude regels Bea, de oudste, staat erop naar school te gaan, compleet met uniform en schooltas Het vijfjarige jongste meisje, later de verteller van het verhaal, verlangt hevig naar aardappelpuree en hoopt dat haar moeder zal trouwen met Bilal die zich in haar fantasie voordoet als haar pappa.De kleur van henna is het humor verteld in een subtiele stijl, met scherp oog voor detail.

    One thought on “De kleur van henna”

    1. Quaint & beautiful. Why Kate Winslet played the mother in the film version after doing "Titanic" is obvious this is an attractive role. The matriarch is positively enigmatic, & the little girls are total darlings. Morocco is a land of enchantment & magic (my one day spent there was one of my most memorable experiences ever), and just like that North African country of camels, couscous, acrobats, bazaars, scorpions, winding roads, this book manages to, in less than 200 pgs, cast one t [...]

    2. There are so many many many many novels which are really memoirs and this is another. I guess they are all published as novels becausea) If you make up stuff in a memoir and you get found out you get nailed to a wall and crows peck out your eyesb) People buy novels, not memoirs. A memoir screams MY LIFE IS REALLY INTERESTING WHILST YOURS FRANKLY ISN’T and a novel is like, I ain’t saying nuffin, I’m just here to cheer you up on a cold wintry evening, pull up a chair, light the light, it’s [...]

    3. You have to hand it to the Freud family. They know how to have colourful lives. OK, they come from pretty historically significant stock which tends to give you a bit of a leg-up in the interesting stakes. Not many of us get to have a historically renowned thinker for a Great-Grandfather or a famous artist for a father, both of which tend to get you invited to dinner parties on the grounds that you'll be a purveyor of fine anecdotal recollections about some hidden family eccentricity or scandal. [...]

    4. حصل أن شاهدت فيلما عن أم انكليزية شابة تأتي المغرب مع ابنتيها الصغيرتين بحثا عن حياة صوفية و خوض تجربة روحية، و تعيش هناك مع صغيرتيها حياة متسكعة فقيرة شاقة مليئة بالمغامرات الفيلم كان مبهجا و ملونا بشكل ملفت، و بدت كل الصعوبات فيه مذللة كما في حكايا الجدات الأمر الذي أثار غر [...]

    5. I'm not sure why so many people love this book. I see no reason to celebrate a flaky mother who neglects her kids. She annoyed me in her selfishness. No, it was more than that; I hated her.The story wasn't terrible, it just really bothered me. As the book went on, it was less adventurous and more heartbreaking. I wished I could reach into the book and slap the hell out of Julia (the mother).I'm sure I'm gonna piss off a lot of people who loved the book, but I can't see the beauty in neglecting c [...]

    6. A strange book in many ways; her first novel I think. Labelling it a novel does not seem right as it reads much more like a travel log of Morocco and feels autobiographical. I wasn't surprised therefore to discover that Esther Freud had lived there for 2 years as a child with her mother and sister. NB. The unnamed narrator of the story is living there with her mother and elder sister. It is in many ways life observed through the eyes of children – the narrator, a wide eyed little girl and her [...]

    7. I remember the film of this book vaguely, and I personally enjoyed the film more than the book, which doesn't really capture the atmosphere of Africa in the same way as the film did. Nevertheless, Hideous Kinky is still a very good novel and an interesting adventure taken by an unconventional family.

    8. I utterly adore this book. The vibrant, sensory descriptions of Marrakech and Morocco are delicious to read, and the relationship between the sisters is realistic. The narrator (the unnamed younger sister) looks at things sometimes naively, sometimes with a wisdom beyond her age. I found myself empathising with Bea more - I suppose because I'm an older sister too, but also because she was very much like me personality-wise (the sensible one). Sometimes characters are introduced then tantalisingl [...]

    9. Not many adult books are written from a child’s perspective and not many of those books are good. This is. The narrator is a five year old who travels with her seven year old sister and her mother to Marrakech. It seems to be the 60s because everyone is very free. School? Not necessary. Brushing teeth? Not happening. Dentil problems due to not brushing? Oh well. Money to pay the rent? It will get here, eventually.The narrator chronicles the sister’s journey as their mother drifts around Marr [...]

    10. Just like the narrator's mother, this book meanders along rather aimlessly. And rather than be enchanted or amused by the character of a young woman who takes her two young children to Morocco in search of 'enlightenment', I found myself becoming quite angry with her fecklessness and what I saw as neglect of her children's needs.The writing itself is strong, but I was also quite shocked when the narrator's age is eventually revealed as four. The character of a young child is never really capture [...]

    11. I thought I wouldn't like this at first, but actually it was really good. I think the title does it a real disservice because it sounds so ridiculous. Once you know what it means, it makes sense, but when you first pick up a book, the title shouldn't be so off-putting, should it?That aside, this is a very subtle piece of writing. The child's point of view is strictly adhered to, so no interpretation of events is offered. Yet the reader is given plentiful evidence of the child's increasing distre [...]

    12. Superb imagination and control, that's what the author exhibited in this novel. From the book's cover I learned that this had been made into a film with Kate Winslet (of the Titanic) in the lead role. I haven't seen it yet, but I think Ms. Winslet indeed fits the role of the young, hippie mother with two daughters, ages 5 and 7.They were English. For some unclear reasons, the mother took her kids away from London and went to Morocco. The father was left in London, but it wasn't clear also if he [...]

    13. An interesting book for its narrative point of view. It is the story of two children going to Morocco with their thoroughly Bohemian mother and is told from the perspective of the youngest child (aged three or four). It was fascinating because there was very little in the way of tone - defined by the IB English A1 Bible as 'the attitude of the author or narrator to their subject'. What I mean is that there was very little judgement - everything was described, but the only conclusions were direct [...]

    14. A light, easy, possibly superficial, read that charts the life of two young children and their mother on the hippy trail in 60s Morocco. Whether you find the novel liberating or frustrating will largely depend on how you perceive the actions of the mother. While clearly a loving parent, her lifestyle leads to the children starving, begging, sleeping rough, taking narcotics and even being abandoned on the streets of Marrakech while the mother takes off on a whim to become a Sufi.While it's intere [...]

    15. One of the rare instances where I preferred the movie to the book. Kate Winslett was perfectly cast and the setting was very intriguing.

    16. I like the author's writing style: very simple, subtle, poignant and funny at times. And this one had a better story than the other book I read from her (Love Falls), which ended up disappointing.

    17. I think the hardest thing for an author to get right is striking the balance between either giving the reader too little information or issues to explore, or too much: prescribing conclusions without leaving time or room to ponder. I can’t quite work out if Hideous Kinky suffers from a dearth of thought provoking material (i.e.- it’s dull), or is actually refreshingly free.Let’s get this out of the way- Hideous kinky has no plot to speak of. It’s essentially about a mixed up mother of tw [...]

    18. Blurb on the back: The debut novel from the author of "Summer at Gaglow, " called "a near-seamless meshing of family feeling, history and imagination" by the "New York Times" Book Review. Escaping gray London in 1972, a beautiful, determined mother takes her daughters, aged 5 and 7, to Morocco in search of adventure, a better life, and maybe love. "Hideous Kinky" follows two little English girls -- the five-year-old narrator and Bea, her seven-year-old sister -- as they struggle to establish som [...]

    19. Feckless mother or enlightened childhood?This for me feels a hard book to review as I have mixed feelings about it or maybe just the message that's intended.This is a tale of two young children taken to Morocco in the 1960's by their hippy mother and their experiences there.There is no doubt that the book is well written from the point of a young girl which is maintained throughout,no mean feat in itself, but that also means that the narrative becomes meandering just like their mother's wanderin [...]

    20. This book was a bit odd. It was great to see the cultural aspects - such as how blowing your nose and sneezing is 'done' differently in Morocco (or this is the sense I get in the book) but as a story it's a bit weak. I didn't really get vibrant descriptions about the land or culture or anything really which I would have liked, as the glimpses we did get were gorgeous. This story is essentially about a mother who somewhat neglects her children, actually leaving one for an unknown period of time w [...]

    21. The most loveable and intriguing part of this story was that it was told from the perspective of 5 year old Lucy. And even more so was Freud's ability to keep the magical thinking and ideas of Lucy throughout the book which left me wanting more. Lucy sees all as an adventure and makes keen observations about the adults around her including Mum. Bea who is older is more practical and longs for a more normal and less outrageous Mum.The story begins with Lucy's mother deciding to go to Morocco with [...]

    22. "It wasn't until we were halfway thorough France that we noticed Maretta wasn't talking." Maretta wasn't saying much, so I suppose it was a good thing she ended up not being very important to the narrative. The narrator is the younger daughter of an English woman traveling through Morocco. There is a father, but we learn nothing of him. We never learn why the mother is dragging her two young daughters through the streets of Marrakech (and beyond), often unsure of where they will stay next or whe [...]

    23. That was such a powerful statement, that last paragraph of this story. I wish the rest of the story had been as human and sensitive; or had dared to explore the relationships between the mother and her children.I don't understand how this novel became so prize worthy - is it because the author's from a famous family, or was she really young when she wrote it, or something? Yeah, it's a story and I was glad to read about life off the beaten track in Morocco in the sixties. I found the story itsel [...]

    24. I remember when this movie came out. I saw a preview for it with my mother and we both looked at each other and said we wanted to see it. Somehow that never happened.So when I discovered that this was a book on the 1001 books list I was very excited. Probably too much so. The basic premise of this book is that a woman moves to Morocco with her two daughters aged 5 and 7. The younger daughter narrates the story and the older daughter rebels, clinging onto any "English" life she can. Now being tol [...]

    25. I really enjoyed this book and thought Freud really skilfully captured a child's voice. Other reviewers have said the characters are 2D but you are only getting a 5 year old's perspective on them, and her view would obviously only take in parts of a person and their actions & story- all the mother's boyfriends, for example, are seen only as Lucy interacted with them and you aren't shown any of the romantic side of their relationship with Julia beyond the occasional kiss. It was especially fu [...]

    26. This is the story of a mother and her two young daughters living in Morocco, told by her youngest daughter who (we find out near enough at the end of the book) is only 5! Even thought the story had an innocence and naivety, I don't think having a 5 year old narrator was the right thing here. For starters it gave her far too sophisticated voice to tell the story with and make it believable (being that she was as young as she was). It also made it hard to get a fix on exactly what was happening, w [...]

    27. It was a slow start, but once I got going, I was completely in love. I have mad wanderlust and sometimes books like this are all I can do to keep myself from jumping on a plane. This one captured my imagination by giving the feeling of living in Morocco without a plan, practically penniless, and even as I was feeling sorry for the young girls, I wanted to be there with them.Thankfully, the author is able to give us this story without demonizing the mother. We come to understand her a little bit [...]

    28. I read this book after I saw the movie, and thought they pretty much had the same feel. Anyhow, the mother is very into her plans and searches for enlightenment. It doesn't seem to bother her to be put into precarious positions in an Arabic country with her children-sort of a hands-off hippie anti-establishment upbringing. This really bothered one of my friends that watched the movie with me. But I felt that the book (and movie) really emphasized the 6 year old's point of view as she traipses al [...]

    29. Absolutely devoured this book, and not just from either hunger for serious fiction or from the ridiculously delicious descriptions of Moroccan food (which I spent almost the entire book craving.) It's a really good book. The narrator's voice is authentic without being too precocious and cloying, and some of the truly harrowing stuff Mum puts her kids through is made even more shocking by the matter-of-fact tone in which the events are related. The only reason I didn't give it five stars instead [...]

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