Mine's Bigger: The Extraordinary Tale of the World's Greatest Sailboat and the Silicon Valley Tycoon Who Built It

Mine s Bigger The Extraordinary Tale of the World s Greatest Sailboat and the Silicon Valley Tycoon Who Built It As the dominant venture capitalist of Silicon Valley Tom Perkins had seemingly done it all from amassing a billion dollar fortune to getting himself convicted of manslaughter in France But his ultima

  • Title: Mine's Bigger: The Extraordinary Tale of the World's Greatest Sailboat and the Silicon Valley Tycoon Who Built It
  • Author: David A. Kaplan
  • ISBN: 9780061374029
  • Page: 457
  • Format: Paperback
  • As the dominant venture capitalist of Silicon Valley, Tom Perkins had seemingly done it all from amassing a billion dollar fortune to getting himself convicted of manslaughter in France But his ultimate dream was to create the biggest, fastest, riskiest, highest tech, most self indulgent sailboat ever built.With keen storytelling and biting wit, bestselling author David AAs the dominant venture capitalist of Silicon Valley, Tom Perkins had seemingly done it all from amassing a billion dollar fortune to getting himself convicted of manslaughter in France But his ultimate dream was to create the biggest, fastest, riskiest, highest tech, most self indulgent sailboat ever built.With keen storytelling and biting wit, bestselling author David A Kaplan takes us inside the mind of an American genius and behind the scenes of an extraordinary venture the birth of Perkins s 130 million marvel The Maltese Falcon This modern clipper ship is as long as a football field and forty two feet wide, with three rotating masts, each twenty stories high, and a bridge straight out of Star Trek The riveting biography of a remarkable ship and the remarkable man who built it, Mine s Bigger is an unforgettable profile of ambition, hubris, audacity, and the imagination of a legendary entrepreneur.

    One thought on “Mine's Bigger: The Extraordinary Tale of the World's Greatest Sailboat and the Silicon Valley Tycoon Who Built It”

    1. Tom Perkins, member of the notorious HP board during the now infamous board battles (see /review/show), was no land-lubber. He could name all of the lines on a clipper ship. He wanted something even bigger and better. But as someone of immense wealth, the push for ever bigger and better became an obsession. “size mattered—as it always had. When it quickly became insufficient to be merely big, then yours had to be bigger. For how shall it profit a man to have a big yacht if somebody else has [...]

    2. This is a relatively slim book that packs a lot of content. the main story line revolves around Tom Perkins' quest to build the world's largest private sailing ship. the amount of technology that goes into the Maltese Falcon is staggering, as is the price. as bonuses, we get a lot of info on Perkins' history in Silicon Valley, which is essentially the history of venture capital and modern high tech, and a survey of sailing through the ages. plus, lots of interesting and funny anecdotes about the [...]

    3. I enjoyed the early portions of this book discussing the life and career of Tom Perkins. However you'll find the majority of the book is dedicated to discussing the construction of the Maltese Falcon. This is likely interesting to many - but with little knowledge of sailing I felt inundated with details. Overall the insights into Perkins made it a worthy read.

    4. File under "The Rich: They're Different From You and Me." Definitely written for the kind of person who wonders, when passed by a fellow in a flashy sports car, "What is he compensating for?" (I am that person, about 30 percent of the time.) Author Kaplan, a Newsweek guy, does a good job of condensing Sailing for Dummies into the 5 page synopsis a non-nautical reader needs to keep up. But he runs aground on that shoal of modern journalism -- the fact that powerful, media-savvy people know better [...]

    5. An interesting book about an amazing and ostentatious vessel. It is at once a testimony to innovation and to conspicuous consumption. Perkins had a dream about building a modern age clipper ship and he did so. That he and many of his financier friends have the money to waste on such toys goes largely unquestioned in the book. More information on the actual vessel, how it was built, and what it can do could easily have made this a better read (it has far too much information onPerkins, so much so [...]

    6. A detailed book about a innovative boat, but the real story is about Tom Perkins and his incredible self-centeredness and ego. His drive to use his millions to build a bigger toy than other billionaires rather than benefit others (such as Bill Gates has done) was contrasted with the previous book I had read (Three Cups of Tea) about one of the world's most unselfish people (Greg Mortenson). As a sailor, I was fascinated by the boat, but repelled by the man.

    7. Fantastic book about Tom Perkins, the silicon valley legend, and his quest to build the biggest sailing boat ever. The book delves into Perkins (the HP board room brawl etc), but the main point is about the boat Maltese Falcon and it's crew. It's an altogether fascinating view into the world of the super-rich and the idiosyncracies of that life, but also what does it really take to build the most advancedsailing boat ever.

    8. I really enjoyed this book. Apart from the details it gives about Business (Venture Capital) and the history of sailing, the one thing that made me REALLY enjoy this book was Google Images! When reading it, do yourself a favor and search for all the boats he mentions either by name or class. That really made me enjoy reading it, as being no expert on sailing, the pictures and Kaplan's explanations made it very very enjoyable.

    9. Good look at the yacht and the world around it. Relaxing read for those interested in silicon valley, it's actors and boats.

    10. A somber and sober look at the pinnacle of conspicuous consumption mixed with extreme nerdery. A few interesting anecdotes and a whole lot of rehashing of boring (and unimportant) details.

    11. a little interestinga little slow. maybe if i was more interested in the 'tech' world and boats it would have been more captivating.

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