Tallis's History and Description of the Crystal Palace, and the Exhibition of the World's Industry in 1851, Vol. 2: Illustrated by Beautiful Steel Engravings (Classic Reprint)

Tallis s History and Description of the Crystal Palace and the Exhibition of the World s Industry in Vol Illustrated by Beautiful Steel Engravings Classic Reprint Excerpt from Tallis s History and Description of the Crystal Palace and the Exhibition of the World s Industry in Vol Illustrated by Beautiful Steel EngravingsIr as the poet tells us Men ar

  • Title: Tallis's History and Description of the Crystal Palace, and the Exhibition of the World's Industry in 1851, Vol. 2: Illustrated by Beautiful Steel Engravings (Classic Reprint)
  • Author: John Tallis
  • ISBN: 9781333548384
  • Page: 482
  • Format: Paperback
  • Excerpt from Tallis s History and Description of the Crystal Palace, and the Exhibition of the World s Industry in 1851, Vol 2 Illustrated by Beautiful Steel EngravingsIr, as the poet tells us, Men are but children of a larger growth, then we shall need no apology for introducing the subject of Toys to the consideration of our readers especially when we call to mind theExcerpt from Tallis s History and Description of the Crystal Palace, and the Exhibition of the World s Industry in 1851, Vol 2 Illustrated by Beautiful Steel EngravingsIr, as the poet tells us, Men are but children of a larger growth, then we shall need no apology for introducing the subject of Toys to the consideration of our readers especially when we call to mind the remark of one of the most eminent of modern philo sophers, viz that boys toys are the most philosophical things In the world and that of an equally renowned statesman, who, taking another view of their importance, affirms that they are an index to the character of a nation Now we beg leave to remark, that it is to the toys of the male sex that the observation of the sage philosopher is solely applicable, inasmuch as they are always directed to the intellectual quality of the masculine understanding, or to its bellicose propensities whereas the toys con trived for the amusement of the gentler sex are invariably such as minister to the gentler affections of the heart, to tenderness, to love, and the whole range of domestic virtues In illustration of the first position, as it is observed in the Report of the Juries, a few examples may be cited A boy s kite, in the hands of a Frankhn and a Romas, has served to identify lightning with electricity, and convey an instructive lesson on the composition of mechanical forces The pea shooter not only affords evidence of the elastic force of gases, but also of their economical employment when used expansively The sucker illustrates the weight of the atmosphere, and its equal pressure in all directions and the sling, the hoop, and the top, Show the property of centrifugal force when the top is in rapid motion, it converts for the moment, every spot and bruise on its surface into an elegant zone, and thus also imparts a good lesson in physiological optics To a re ecting mind toys a ord ample food for thought, and they might be made, perhaps, to yield much solid instruction to the child, were it not generally far wise, for a certain period, at least, to limit its inquiries rather to the discovery of the weakest parts of its plaything With regard to the assertion, that toys indicate the genius of a nation, it is evident that, as the natural tendency of children is to imitate the employ ments of their elders, they will always take the most interest in such toys as will assist them in this propensity, and lead them in their sports to do that which they see those around them doing in earnest Hence, in countries which are of a military disposition, ags, drums, trumpets, guns, swords, and the accoutrements of soldiers, are much in demand for the pastime of even the youngest boys In a maritime nation toy ships will be esteemed, and thus the very pastimes of childhood might be made available in promoting the welfare of such services as the particular state most requires The Exhibition, therefore, might have afforded an interesting opportunity to statesmen and philanthropists for studying the diversity of character exemplified by the contributing nations, had they been all as well represented in their toys as they were in their other manufactures This, however, was far from being the case, many countries, although largely employed 1n the manufacture of toys, having nearly or altogether neglected sending specimens America, for instance, was extremely deficient In her contribution of toys Austria, on the other hand, was well and Copiously represented in the toy trade.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books Find at forgottenbooks

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