Lost Sound: The Forgotten Art of Radio Storytelling

Lost Sound The Forgotten Art of Radio Storytelling From Archibald MacLeish to David Sedaris radio storytelling has long borrowed from the world of literature yet the narrative radio work of well known writers and others is a story that has not been

  • Title: Lost Sound: The Forgotten Art of Radio Storytelling
  • Author: Jeff Porter
  • ISBN: 9781469627779
  • Page: 472
  • Format: Paperback
  • From Archibald MacLeish to David Sedaris, radio storytelling has long borrowed from the world of literature, yet the narrative radio work of well known writers and others is a story that has not been told before And when the literary aspects of specific programs such as The War of the Worlds or Sorry, Wrong Number were considered, scrutiny was superficial In Lost Sound,From Archibald MacLeish to David Sedaris, radio storytelling has long borrowed from the world of literature, yet the narrative radio work of well known writers and others is a story that has not been told before And when the literary aspects of specific programs such as The War of the Worlds or Sorry, Wrong Number were considered, scrutiny was superficial In Lost Sound, Jeff Porter examines the vital interplay between acoustic techniques and modernist practices in the growth of radio Concentrating on the 1930s through the 1970s, but also speaking to the rising popularity of today s narrative broadcasts such as This American Life, Radiolab, Serial, and The Organicist, Porter s close readings of key radio programs show how writers adapted literary techniques to an acoustic medium with great effect Addressing avant garde sound poetry and experimental literature on the air, alongside industry policy and network economics, Porter identifies the ways radio challenged the conventional distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow cultural content to produce a dynamic popular culture.

    One thought on “Lost Sound: The Forgotten Art of Radio Storytelling”

    1. This is a thesis or dissertationI don't know what the confusion seems to be for other readers as the author explicitly states this at the beginning. As such, I wasn't really off-put as other readers seemed to beI have started realizing I do like reading slightly more academic theses-to-books like these. This is not a comprehensive reminiscence of old-time radio shows. It covers a few big personalities, audio techniques, a good dose of theory and philosophy behind the medium, and a few of the gam [...]

    2. This was such a disappointing book. I couldn't even make it through it. It's definitely not the way to talk about such a rich and lively topic as old time radio. It reads more like the doctoral thesis of some obscure PhD candidate who is trying to impress his review board by how much technical jargon and fringe philosophical theories he can include within the pages. It's so dry and lifeless that I had trouble staying awake. The author seems to have never listened to old time radio in its proper [...]

    3. Sound in radio – what is it that this book is about? Is it sound effects? Is it tone? Is it a technical discussion? Is it a philosophy? Is it voice? Ends up, for this book, sound is all of that and more. The author illustrates different impacts of the sound of radio at different times and in a number of different projects. A first big case study is of “Sorry, Wrong Number” as produced on radio but with a lengthy comparison to the movie version. Another case study was of “War of the World [...]

    4. This book reads like a terribly graduate research paper. There isn't anything engaging or entertaining about a book with such an exciting and entertaining topic. Low energy. Sad!

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