The Storm of Creativity

The Storm of Creativity The stages of the creative process from unlearning to beginning again seen through examples from the practice of artists architects poets inventors scientists and others Although each instance of

  • Title: The Storm of Creativity
  • Author: Kyna Leski John Maeda
  • ISBN: 9780262029940
  • Page: 350
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The stages of the creative process from unlearning to beginning again seen through examples from the practice of artists, architects, poets, inventors, scientists, and others Although each instance of creativity is singular and specific, Kyna Leski tells us, the creative process is universal Artists, architects, poets, inventors, scientists, and others all navigaThe stages of the creative process from unlearning to beginning again seen through examples from the practice of artists, architects, poets, inventors, scientists, and others Although each instance of creativity is singular and specific, Kyna Leski tells us, the creative process is universal Artists, architects, poets, inventors, scientists, and others all navigate the same stages of the process in order to discover something that does not yet exist All of us must work our way through the empty page, the blank screen, writer s block, confusion, chaos, and doubt In this book, Leski draws from her observations and experiences as a teacher, student, maker, writer, and architect to describe the workings of the creative process.Leski sees the creative process as being like a storm it slowly begins to gather and take form until it overtakes us if we are willing to let it It is dynamic, continually in motion it starts, stops, rages and abates, ebbs and flows In illustrations that accompany each chapter, she maps the arc of the creative process by tracing the path of water droplets traveling the stages of a storm.Leski describes unlearning, ridding ourselves of preconceptions only when we realize what we don t know can we pose the problem that we need to solve We gather evidence with notebook jottings, research, the collection of objects propelling the process We perceive and conceive we look ahead without knowing where we are going we make connections We pause, retreat, and stop, only to start again To illustrate these stages of the process, Leski draws on examples of creative practice that range from Paul Klee to Steve Jobs, from the discovery of continental drift to the design of Antoni Gaudi s Sagrada Familia.Creativity, Leski tells us, is a path with no beginning or end it is ongoing This revelatory view of the creative process will be an essential guide for anyone engaged in creative discovery.The Creative ProcessUnlearningProblem MakingGathering and TrackingPropellingPerceiving and ConceivingSeeing AheadConnectingPausingContinuing

    One thought on “The Storm of Creativity”

    1. "Still, as the Spanish philosopher Jose Ortega y Gasset (1883-1955) wrote in one of his many essays:To be shipwrecked is not to drown. The poor human being feeling himself sinking into the abyss, moves his arm to keep afloat.The peril those students feel as their preconceptions disappear is a good thing that helps them achieve an open mind. Ortega y Gasset continued,Some discontinuity must therefore intervene, in order that man may renew his feeling of peril, the substance of his life. All his l [...]

    2. I myself experience creativity like a storm, and was interested to see how far she could take the metaphor. Not very far, but that's okay. I enjoyed reading this book with it's jolts of inspiration here and there.

    3. Interesting read on creativity from a design thinking perspective. Leski includes 10 chapters, each involving a particular aspect of the creative process, and she uses a metaphor of a meteorological storm for the creative process throughout the book. Overall, there are some really interesting things in this text for those studying creativity.

    4. Interesting book, not quite what I was expecting when I picked it up (I was preparing for a workshop on spirituality and the visual arts, with an emphasis on doing) - but I'm glad to have read it. Lots of examples from a lot of different sources, including some that I'd heard before but wouldn't have thought to include (but were clearly relevant).

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