State and Society in the Early Middle Ages: The Middle Rhine Valley, 400 1000

State and Society in the Early Middle Ages The Middle Rhine Valley This book shows just how much can be discovered about the so called Dark Ages between the fall of Rome and the high Middle Ages Whereas it is believed widely that the source materials for early medie

  • Title: State and Society in the Early Middle Ages: The Middle Rhine Valley, 400 1000
  • Author: Matthew Innes
  • ISBN: 9780521594554
  • Page: 124
  • Format: Hardcover
  • This book shows just how much can be discovered about the so called Dark Ages, between the fall of Rome and the high Middle Ages Whereas it is believed widely that the source materials for early medieval Europe are too sparse to allow sustained study of social and political relationships, State and Society in the Early Middle Ages offers a detailed analysis of the workiThis book shows just how much can be discovered about the so called Dark Ages, between the fall of Rome and the high Middle Ages Whereas it is believed widely that the source materials for early medieval Europe are too sparse to allow sustained study of social and political relationships, State and Society in the Early Middle Ages offers a detailed analysis of the workings of society at the heart of Charlemagne s empire, and suggests the need to rethink our understanding of political power in this period.

    One thought on “State and Society in the Early Middle Ages: The Middle Rhine Valley, 400 1000”

    1. Despite the title of this book, Innes is really focusing on the late eighth and early ninth centuries, looking at how power and authority worked at that period in the Middle Rhine Valley. Innes chose that area because of the unusually high survival of charters (from Lorsch and Fulda), and indeed this is why I read the book: it's outside of my usual geographical and temporal foci, but I was interested to see the techniques which Innes uses to analyse his source evidence. Particularly how he recre [...]

    2. This is a really deep study of land holding patterns and kinship and social structures, primarily during the 8th-9th centuries. It's an academic book, so there is a lot of technical jargon and it's not intended for casual readers. However, the amount of undefined non-English terms used isn't conducive to cross-field study. The maps and genealogy charts included were very clear and useful, however.

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