On This Day in Poetry History: Poems

On This Day in Poetry History Poems In her newest feat of poetic innovation Amy Newman wanders the lives of mid century poetry immortals including Berryman Bishop Lowell Plath and Sexton peeking in from the periphery on personal

  • Title: On This Day in Poetry History: Poems
  • Author: Amy Newman
  • ISBN: 9780892554706
  • Page: 121
  • Format: Paperback
  • In her newest feat of poetic innovation, Amy Newman wanders the lives of mid century poetry immortals, including Berryman, Bishop, Lowell, Plath, and Sexton, peeking in from the periphery on personal moments both sensational and mundane, imagining their consequences for the poets, their readers, and their shared American century Affecting and refreshing, a perfect mix ofIn her newest feat of poetic innovation, Amy Newman wanders the lives of mid century poetry immortals, including Berryman, Bishop, Lowell, Plath, and Sexton, peeking in from the periphery on personal moments both sensational and mundane, imagining their consequences for the poets, their readers, and their shared American century Affecting and refreshing, a perfect mix of literariness and pulp, On this Day in Poetry History is the latest accomplishment from a poet of incomparable wit and imagination.

    One thought on “On This Day in Poetry History: Poems”

    1. Loved this book, just as I have loved all of Amy Newman's work over the years. Funny that the image of roots reoccurs throughout these wonderfully lyrical and biographical poems. Bishop, Roethke, Berryman, Jarrell, Schwartz, Lowell, Sexton, and Plath are the subjects (Philip Levine, James Wright, Maxine Kumin, among others, make cameos) and Newman manages to both re-imagine and pay tender homage to the details of each poet's life (soul, heart, and mind!) without cheapening those lives.

    2. Each poem begins with a line that is a reference to an event or activity of a 20th century poet: Sexton, Bishop, Roethke. So, I felt left out, not really knowing much about the lives of these people, let alone much of their work. But, I found this writing compelling enough to keep going, and I found real beauty in this book.

    3. This was so unbelievably good omg.Newman captures small moments in the lives of mid-century American poets like Lowell, Plath, Sexton, Berryman, and Bishop. Each poem places the poets in a multidimensional historical space, contrasting their actions with concurrent actions of other poets. Throughout there's a sort of mounting sense of dread because we know how it ends for so many of these poets: especially Plath, Sexton, and Berryman. We know the tragedy and desperation of their battle against m [...]

    4. Amy Newman does high-concept as well as any poet. This intensely researched book mines the lives of seven poets and jumps off their biographies to create a combined chronology of the Confessional movement.It's a case where sometimes it's fun seeing the seams. There's a clear formula to each poem, right up until the final seven poems, which serve as elegies.I mean, it's insular as can be, but for poetry lovers and literary theorists, it's real fun.

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