The Passing of the Aborigines

The Passing of the Aborigines DAISY BATES As the years passed I was and convinced that it was impossible to leave these people to be deaf to their appeal for human kindliness and of the hopelessness of any movement except one o

  • Title: The Passing of the Aborigines
  • Author: Daisy Bates
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 494
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • DAISY BATES As the years passed, I was and convinced that it was impossible to leave these people, to be deaf to their appeal for human kindliness, and of the hopelessness of any movement except one of help and comfort to the individual, and personal example So savage and so simple, so much astray and so utterly helpless were they, that somehow they became myrDAISY BATES As the years passed, I was and convinced that it was impossible to leave these people, to be deaf to their appeal for human kindliness, and of the hopelessness of any movement except one of help and comfort to the individual, and personal example So savage and so simple, so much astray and so utterly helpless were they, that somehow they became myresponsibility All along the thousand miles of railway, there was no other sanctuary, no half way house, as it were, between the white man s traffic and the native intelligence, five thousand years behind She has neither sought fame nor found it She has made no moneyby her long life s work Through all these years she has been alone, cutoff from the world, with only these strange, backward, hopeless people togive her a little human society now and then There is in her lifesomething of the spirit of service that moved Florence Nightingale, andsomething of the spirit of sacrifice that filled the heart of FatherDamien She would not put it so, for she has loved her life and made ajoy of her labour, but it is right that tribute should be paid to Mrs.Daisy Bates She went out to her Aborigines in the first years of this century Shefound them decreasing in numbers with the coming of the white man, theirroot foods ploughed up, the tracks to their water holes disappearing Shewrote a history of them which still remains in manuscript When thecentury was ten years old she went out to two islands on a Commission tostudy the hospital treatment of these poor people, and while there sheset up a post office so that the patients could communicate with theirfamilies on the mainland One of the first services she rendered to themwas to conduct a mail with notched sticks, conveying messages to theirfriends She had forty patients on her hands and pulled every onethrough She kept them tranquil and cheerful in their bush shelters, satby their sick beds listening to their tribal stories, joined with them inpraying to their totems when they wanted rain They had never knownanyone like her They named her Kabbarli, grandmother.

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