The Emperor of Water Clocks

The Emperor of Water Clocks The wildly enchanting new collection from the Pulitzer Prize winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa If I am not Ulysses I am his dear ruthless half brother So announces Yusef Komunyakaa early in his lush new

  • Title: The Emperor of Water Clocks
  • Author: Yusef Komunyakaa
  • ISBN: 9780374147839
  • Page: 221
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The wildly enchanting new collection from the Pulitzer Prize winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa If I am not Ulysses, I am his dear, ruthless half brother So announces Yusef Komunyakaa early in his lush new collection, The Emperor of Water Clocks But Ulysses or his half brother is but one of the beguiling guises Komunyakaa dons over the course of this densely lyrical bookThe wildly enchanting new collection from the Pulitzer Prize winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa If I am not Ulysses, I am his dear, ruthless half brother So announces Yusef Komunyakaa early in his lush new collection, The Emperor of Water Clocks But Ulysses or his half brother is but one of the beguiling guises Komunyakaa dons over the course of this densely lyrical book Here his speaker observes a doomed court jester here he is with Napoleon, as the emperor tells the doctor to cut out his heart send it to the empress, Marie Louise here he is at the circus, observing as The strong man presses six hundred pounds, his muscles flexed for the woman whose T shirt says, these guns are loaded and here is just a man, placing a few red anemones a sheaf of wheat on Mahmoud Darwish s grave, reflecting on why I d rather die a poet than a warrior Through these mutations and migrations and permutations and peregrinations there are constants Komunyakaa s jazz inflected rhythms his effortlessly surreal images his celebration of natural beauty and of love There is also his insistent inquiry into the structures and struggles of power not only of, say, king against jester but of man against his own desire and of the present against the pernicious influence of the past Another brilliant collection from the man David Wojahn has called one of our most significant and individual voices, The Emperor of Water Clocks delights, challenges, and satisfies.

    One thought on “The Emperor of Water Clocks”

    1. I don’t read a lot of poetry. I make this admission with a sense of guilt, one borne out of the fact that I generally consider myself a very sophisticated reader, one who probably should be reading a lot more poetry.I blame the culture I live in. (It’s much easier than blaming myself, and culture is always a good stand-by culprit for which to assess blame, after parents, too much TV, and drugs.)You have to admit, we live in a culture that doesn’t really appreciate poetry, outside of very s [...]

    2. Finally. Finally. Finally. A collection I actually enjoyed. My favorites were Rock Me, Mercy; The Relic; Et Tu Brutus?; Envoy to Palestine; Monolith; Torsion; and The Green Horse.

    3. I'm a poet and a poetry minor and my taste is basically Yusef Komunyakaa now. Perfect blend of elegance and grittiness, real and surreal, ancient and modern. I fell so in love

    4. Yusef's poems could take place in an hour glass, only the sand is flowing neither upwards nor downwards, but swirls in place, like a billow of millenniums, or decades. Or days, or hours. Even milliseconds, and every word would sound as breathtaking as the last.I picked this up on a whim at a local bookstore because I liked the cover, which is just about the most sacrilegious statement I could think of when describing why I decided to read this book. I'd love to say I felt some overwhelming sense [...]

    5. There is so much to love about "The Emperor of Water Clocks", though perhaps my favourite was the blend of the fantastical and the real. Poems like "The Emperor" were little treasures to read and twirl in the hands, each angle offering something exciting. I was impressed particularly the way Komunyakaa was able to switch gears in many of the poems but never lose that original atmosphere he set up within the first few lines. His poems make plot feel like an integral plot of poetry, though so many [...]

    6. The best 10-12 poems in this collection meet (or at least come close to) the supernaturally high standards Yusef Komunyakaa set for himself in Copacetic, I Apologize for the Eyes in My Heve, Magic City and Dien Cai Dau. Komunyakaa has an unerring sense of rhythm and some of his images are still echoing around in my skull thirty years after I first encountered them. A sample from "Sprung Rhythm of a Landscape": I, too, know my Hopkins (Lightnin' & Gerard Manley), gigging to this after-hours [...]

    7. In a world where the collected Tumblr memes of teenage girls dominate the poetry bestsellers list, it was both a relief and a thrill to dig into a book of – for lack of a better word – real poetry: the fifteenth and most recent collection by Pulitzer Prize winner Yusef Komunyakaa. Substantive, authoritative, and downright meaty, the fifty-eight pieces in The Emperor of Water Clocks cross time and space for their references and metaphors, which range from J. M. W. Turner's death-tinged paint [...]

    8. So good! I'd never heard of Komunyakaa before, which seems crazy given he's won a Pulitzer. I discovered it accidentally -- it was listed on a NY Times list of 100 Notable Books of 2015, and I got very excited because I noticed a writer with my initials, which happens to be one of the categories I was stuck on in a reading challenge I've been working through w/ some friends this year (not a whole lotta "YKs" out there in the lit world, apparently). I highly recommend watching a couple videos of [...]

    9. Several poems I understood, and even loved, yet the majority of the work seems to hide behind allusive images. It's like symbolism put into action. Mind, I didn't analyze every poem by reading it through and through, so the images stuck well within sight. From the poem "Lemons" : "Now, a whiny ghost ship rides nothing but its own oblivion"Oh one of those lines that makes me stop in my tracks. "Lemons," "The Relic," "Et Tu, Brutus?" and "Interrogation" are my favorite poems in this collection.

    10. The latest volume of poetry by this well-known writer that shines withhis cleverness, intelligence and international flavor both in subject andlocation. Nearly magical at times, it is a serious pleasure to read. One poemis a sensitive tribute to the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish. One is a ghazal written after the Ferguson riots. Another one is for Charles Wrightcalled "Sprung Rhythm of a Landscape." Very worth one's while.

    11. Komunyakaa is a surrealist conjurer, magical realist master, blending medieval, mythological, and down on the corner scapes with a deft ear and an unrelenting eye.

    12. My second time reading a collection of poems by current New York State poet Yusef Komunyakaa. As with the first, The Chameleon Couch, this was full of treasures. The first-third did not stir much inside of me, but the deeper I got into the collection the more beautiful and touching I found his words and images. Eager to reading more of his poetry.Stand out poems for me were: "The Water Clock", "Lemons", "Turner's Great Tussle With Water", "Rock Me, Mercy" (in memory of the victims at Newtown), " [...]

    13. The author has a gift of poetry that relates to everyone. I enjoyed the book and would recommend it for those who like poetry, not a book for those who cannot relate to deep meaning of poetry.

    14. I received this book from Good Reads.Excellent poetry. Its not something I read all the time, but I DO enjoy well written, thought provoking ones. This book does that.

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