Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion to Jane Austen

Bedside Bathtub Armchair Companion to Jane Austen Whether you ve read Jane Austen once or read her yearly or if you simply yearn to be Elizabeth or Mr Darcy this new Bedside companion will be a perfect match Janeite and newcomer alike will revel in

  • Title: Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion to Jane Austen
  • Author: Carol J. Adams Douglas Buchanan Kelly Gesch
  • ISBN: 9780826429339
  • Page: 385
  • Format: Paperback
  • Whether you ve read Jane Austen once or read her yearly, or if you simply yearn to be Elizabeth or Mr Darcy, this new Bedside companion will be a perfect match Janeite and newcomer alike will revel in the entertaining capsules of each of Austen s beloved novels, along with information on such important subjects as white soup, carriages, what happened at the ha ha, and, oWhether you ve read Jane Austen once or read her yearly, or if you simply yearn to be Elizabeth or Mr Darcy, this new Bedside companion will be a perfect match Janeite and newcomer alike will revel in the entertaining capsules of each of Austen s beloved novels, along with information on such important subjects as white soup, carriages, what happened at the ha ha, and, of course, all those characters we love to hate In the spirit of Austen, maps, puzzles and quizzes are provided including the one and only Jane Austen aptitude Test The reader is taken on location to Steventon, Jane Austen s childhood home, to Bath, the city she was happy to leave, and elsewhere Also included is an interview with Karen J Fowler, author of The Jane Austen Book Club An Austentatious work, indeed

    One thought on “Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion to Jane Austen ”

    1. If for no other reason, this book is a must read for the Dreamy Collin Firth essay! So true, so true, Mr. Collin Firth you make us swoon.

    2. I have no idea why this was on my to-read shelf when I've literally read this book about five times. Possible one of my favorite books ever written.

    3. This little book is packed with facts on Jane Austen, her writings, her life and times and the various movie adaptations and homages. The book also contains some literary criticism, interviews with Austenesque authors, essays by Austen's characters. "Why I Married Her" by Mr. Bennet is particularly amusing and enlightening though it makes Mr. Bennet seem foolish. A crossword puzzle and lengthy quiz provide some lighthearted fun. Both games had many questions which had little to do with Jane Aust [...]

    4. The Bedside, Bathtub, and Armchair Companion to Jane Austen by Carol Adams, Douglas Buchanan, and Kelly GeschContinuum, 2008218 pagesJane; Non-fiction3.5/5 starsSource: LibrarySummary: A look at Jane Austen's novels, life, and culture with tidbits for newcomers and Janeites alike.Thoughts: I've made no secret of the fact that I'm a big fan of Jane so that's why I picked up this book. I hoped to learn some new facts, which I did, and have some good chuckles, also did.There were also some surprise [...]

    5. Trawling the canon, poking a flashlight into all corners, then-and-now, books-above-and-beyondJaneites are keepers of the greatness that was Jane Austen, shining in her reflected light, as we read tales touched with humor, human nature, disillusion, error, sadness, and joy. A miscellany for the armchair Austenite. Enjoy, enjoy as that guy on TV used to say.

    6. This book reads like a long love letter to Jane Austen, or more like book club discussions rather than offering any real insight. It was simply written though, and I think very accessible to someone who hasn't read any Austen. For anyone who has already read her novels and letters there isn't much to be gleaned from this book.

    7. This is a fun companion for Jane Austen fans to read snippets of in between novels. The authors do not take themselves or Jane too seriously, yet also offer some interesting insights to Jane, her times, and her work.

    8. I've decided I'm one of those people who enjoys reading about Jane Austen more than actually reading her. This was a fun book about her works, without doing summaries of each. Most of it has some sly humor.

    9. Full of Austen minutia but also barely Austen minutia, such as speculating on who tipped off Willoughby's aunt to his intentions toward penniless Marianne? Puh-lease. But I have learned bits about 19th century England, such as the true worth of a barouche!

    10. I skimmed this book. Since it's not the first (nor the last) book I've read on Jane Austen I only stopped to read passages that contained information I might not already know.

    11. A lot of Jane Austen information, but I didn't enjoy it as much as I thought I would. It does do a nice job of not spoiling the endings/climax of the novels in case you haven't read all of them.

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