The Economics of Just About Everything

The Economics of Just About Everything Did you know that another cm of height boosts your income by thousands of dollars per year Or that a boy born in January is nearly twice as likely to play first grade rugby league as a boy born in

  • Title: The Economics of Just About Everything
  • Author: AndrewLeigh
  • ISBN: 9781743314715
  • Page: 215
  • Format: Paperback
  • Did you know that another 10 cm of height boosts your income by thousands of dollars per year Or that a boy born in January is nearly twice as likely to play first grade rugby league as a boy born in December Or that natural disasters attract foreign aid if they happen on a slow news day And that a perfectly clean desk can be as inefficient as a messy one Drawing oDid you know that another 10 cm of height boosts your income by thousands of dollars per year Or that a boy born in January is nearly twice as likely to play first grade rugby league as a boy born in December Or that natural disasters attract foreign aid if they happen on a slow news day And that a perfectly clean desk can be as inefficient as a messy one Drawing on examples and data from across Australia, Andrew Leigh shows how economics can be used to illuminate what happens on the sporting field, in the stockmarket, and at work Economics has things to say about AC DC and Arthur Boyd, dating and dieting, Grange and Geelong, murder and poverty Incentives matter, often in surprising ways, and seemingly simple everyday activities can have unexpected outcomes Insights from behavioural economics can also help us make better decisions.If you like fresh facts and provocative ideas, this is great train and weekend reading You ll soon see the world and the people around you in a new light Essential reading for the 21st century Karl Kruszelnicki Economics isn t the only thing, but Andrew Leigh reminds us that it can explain almost everything George Megalogenis What do you get when you cross a politician with an economist A captivating, charming, and nicely written book Who knew Annabel CrabbAndrew Leigh is the federal member for Fraser, ACT He has a PhD from Harvard, was a Professor of Economics at the Australian National University, appears regularly in the media, and is author of several books, including Battlers and Billionaires.

    One thought on “The Economics of Just About Everything”

    1. The biggest take away from this book is that I shouldn't keep reading books I don't enjoy. I like to finish what I start but if I quit then I have more time to read books that are great. Economics, FTW!

    2. Interesting economic applications that make perfect sense! An excellent book for anyone who wants to know economics applied to everyday life. Highly recommended.

    3. I gave up halfway through this one, and that's more than it deserved.Very early in the book he points out that correlation does not imply causation. It's a massive pet peeve of mine, because statistics seem to be used to draw wild conclusions more often than not these days. As long as you cite some numbers you can make any claim you like as a fact. So when he proceeds to make 1+1=7 on just about every page thereafter I wanted to rip it up.And to add insult to injury he goes off at tangents, jump [...]

    4. This is a solid read and is particularly interesting for those looking for a Freakonomics-style treatment of Australian issues, such as the effect of gun control laws post the Port Arthur massacre. It is clear from the author's liberal inclusion of his own work that he has really rolled up his sleeves with this material, and it is communicated lightly and engagingly, without condescending to the reader. The extensive footnotes back up the material in the main text. There's plenty to think about [...]

    5. "How to apply economics to everyday life" would have been a more suitable title for this book. Plenty of evidences and recurring theme to drive a few simple points. A little too long winded for my liking, but may be suitable for other readers.

    6. The Economics of Just About Everything (2014) by Andrew Leigh is another excellent book from the ALP MP and former academic economist. The book is a popularisation of economic ideas.First the book looks at dating and the 'first optimal stopping problem'. The Leigh examines fitness through the lens of behavioural economics. Then the book looks at sport statistics, career cycles crime, poverty and forecasting. Finally there is a summary of how to use economics in your own life.The book is calm, me [...]

    7. An enjoyable read: a light-hearted delve into the world of the economics of everyday life. Examines some interesting issues, such as when does increasing jail time reduce crime, but at what point does it become counter-productive and increase criminality. Lighter hearted topics include what age to start your child in junior sport for 'success' (though if it depends on birth-date the question is perhaps more which sport would be best for your child's birthday), and how to find your life-partner ( [...]

    8. I'd call this the easy-to-read/Australian equivalent of Freakanomics. That's not meant as a disparaging remark; Freakanomics was a fantastic book and I think Andrew Leigh does a great job of bringing similar themes to a different audience.

    9. Entertaining read on economics. The only issue: Australian examples I don't understand i.e. Aussie football. Other than that, it was a great introduction to the economics of just about everything without it going over board or using too much economic jargon. A definite recommend.

    10. Interesting book that applies economics to a number of different areas, including dating and sport. The references in this book are Australian, so it can be sometimes hard to follow as a non-Aussie. Overall the book was enjoyable.

    11. thought provoking an excellent erudite introduction to current economics thinking told in an easy to read style by an obviously widely and well read author

    12. I liked the fact that the author wrote about Australian identities, sports and situations. However, I felt ripped off when I realised a quarter of the book is references etc.

    13. Basically Freakonomics, but Australian, and with more attempts to change beliefs regarding public policy.

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