Girl 43

Girl A poignant and powerful novel inspired by Maree Giles experience at the infamous Parramatta Girls Home The graffiti on the holding room wall says it all Gunyah is hell on earth And Ellen s about to fi

  • Title: Girl 43
  • Author: Maree Giles
  • ISBN: 9780733633218
  • Page: 303
  • Format: Paperback
  • A poignant and powerful novel inspired by Maree Giles experience at the infamous Parramatta Girls Home.The graffiti on the holding room wall says it all Gunyah is hell on earth And Ellen s about to find out why.Ellen was never the daughter her mother wanted Patent leather shoes and frilly dresses just weren t her thing and, at age fourteen, she s ready to leave schoA poignant and powerful novel inspired by Maree Giles experience at the infamous Parramatta Girls Home.The graffiti on the holding room wall says it all Gunyah is hell on earth And Ellen s about to find out why.Ellen was never the daughter her mother wanted Patent leather shoes and frilly dresses just weren t her thing and, at age fourteen, she s ready to leave school and find her own way No one is going to stop her from going where she wants, doing what she wants, and hanging out with Robbie Or so she thinks.But when the police turn up, Ellen is deemed to be in moral danger and is sentenced to the Gunyah Training School for Girls Suddenly, she s no longer Ellen, she s Girl 43, and she has to follow the rules, work hard and most importantly stay quiet.When it s discovered that she s pregnant, there s no respite from the staff Told she isn t capable of bringing up a child, they twist the truth to make her cooperate But however hard they try, they can t destroy the connection between a mother and her child or can they Drawn from experiences in Parramatta Girls Home in the seventies, Girl 43 is a story that could have come straight from today s headlines about the shocking treatment of innocent children and teens by people in the very institutions that were supposed to protect them.

    One thought on “Girl 43”

    1. Ellen Russell began to feel hot from head to toe the day she was sentenced to six to nine months detention at the Gunyah Training School for Girls. Ellen was considered by the courts as uncontrollable. Ellen had no idea what she was in for, but as soon as she arrived at Gunyah she knew things were about to get a whole lot worse for her. All the girls at Gunyah were badly treated they were made to work hard and they were punished if they did not carry out the work that was assigned to them. The g [...]

    2. When fourteen year old Ellen Russell decided to leave school and move into a small flat with surfer boyfriend Robbie, she could not have foreseen the disastrous turn her future would take. Four months later, after a happy, carefree time together, the police came and took Ellen to the police station. There she was told she needed protection, she was in moral danger; so she was sent to Gunyah Training School for Girls. She was a naïve girl, and had no idea what would happen to her. It was just as [...]

    3. This is a pretty bleak and grim view of events in Australia in the 1970's where basically, young girls could be locked up for being underage and promiscuous. While it is a novel, in some parts it almost reads like a biography. I liked the ending because it was believable and not the obvious happy ending it could have been. I didn't like the "Frank' character as he was not believable, and I would have enjoyed if there had been more character development of Iris Dawson. We see her point of view fo [...]

    4. There was once a time in this country when young girls were capable of being charged by the courts of being 'uncontrollable' and in 'moral danger' and locked away for their supposed own good. Girl 43 is a novel based in this era. What will resonate most with the reader are the sounds, smells and situations the author describes that evoke feelings of fear, desperation , anger and helplessness when describing the situation Ellen finds herself in. Girl 43 also touches on Australia's dark history of [...]

    5. At the very start of this book. It is argued that Australia has had the highest rate of institutionalisation of children in the world. And sadly a royal commission only came to light this year in 2014. Partly because of this book. The girls who went to these homes would have heavy wounds that they must carry for the rest of there lives. We can only hope that the abusers, got there karma in the end. I always wondered what the government and the era was like back then! I thought it was full of you [...]

    6. This is the harrowing tale of Ellen, a teenager deemed to be in 'moral danger and sent to a reform school for girls. Shortly after her arrival she discovers she is pregnant and is tricked into giving up her baby for adoption. The rest of the book revolves around her leaving the home and learning to fend for herself as she searches for her baby.The novel is based on the author's own experiences in the infamous Parramatta Girls' Home and if only half the story is fact, it would be shocking enough. [...]

    7. I very much enjoyed this book. Ellen is a teenager going a little wayward after a few run ins with her mum and boyfriend. She is living with a surfer type in the early 1970's and is put in a type of protective custody which is a shocking way to treat a child. After having a baby she is released but the baby has been adopted out and she tries to beat the system to get her baby back. Beautifully written with great insight into life in Sydney in the 1970's

    8. When I read the blurb on this book I thought I would get a real "shocking insight" into life in the Girls homes in the '70s. Although the author has given some details I was expecting more, perhaps not the right thing to be expecting to read about bad and hurtful actions,but I really thought that there was more to tell. I still enjoyed reading Girl 43s story but just felt there was more to it.

    9. Quite a quick read which was a perk for the book. Unfortunately for me characters were very frustrating to read about, particularly the perspective of the main character. Was very much looking forward to witnessing the insights of this place, might be better as a biography

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