The Year of Living Virtuously: Weekends Off

The Year of Living Virtuously Weekends Off Benjamin Franklin was in his early twenties when he embarked on a bold and arduous project of arriving at moral perfection intending to master the virtues of temperance silence order resolution f

  • Title: The Year of Living Virtuously: Weekends Off
  • Author: Teresa Jordan
  • ISBN: 9781619024274
  • Page: 420
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Benjamin Franklin was in his early twenties when he embarked on a bold and arduous project of arriving at moral perfection, intending to master the virtues of temperance, silence, order, resolution, frugality, industry, sincerity, justice, moderation, cleanliness, tranquility, chastity, and humility He soon gave up on perfection but continued to believe that these virtuBenjamin Franklin was in his early twenties when he embarked on a bold and arduous project of arriving at moral perfection, intending to master the virtues of temperance, silence, order, resolution, frugality, industry, sincerity, justice, moderation, cleanliness, tranquility, chastity, and humility He soon gave up on perfection but continued to believe that these virtues, coupled with a generous heart and a bemused acceptance of human frailty, laid the foundation for not only a good life but also a workable society.Writer and visual artist Teresa Jordan wondered if Franklin s perhaps antiquated notions of virtue might offer guidance to a nation increasingly divided by angry righteousness She decided to try to live his list for a year, focusing on each virtue for a week at a time and taking weekends off to attend to the seven deadly sins.The journal she kept became this collection of beautifully illustrated essays, weaving personal anecdotes with the views of theologians, philosophers, ethicists, evolutionary biologists, and a whole range of scholars and scientists within the emerging field of consciousness studies.Teresa Jordan offers a wry and intimate journey into a year in midlife devoted to the challenge of trying to live authentically.

    One thought on “The Year of Living Virtuously: Weekends Off”

    1. This book was not quite what I expected based on the title and jacket description. I was expecting an A.J. Jacobs-esque attempt to recreate Benjamin Franklin's year-long mindfulness experiment, with a week tracking each of his identified virtues, and a linear description of the situations that arose. Now, I have not read Jordon's blog that she based this book on, and maybe that was the original structure, in which case I appreciate not wanting to mimic the blog directly. This book does not reall [...]

    2. In high school, Benjamin Franklin's autobiograpy was part of our assigned reading list and one passage from that has really stuck with me over the years. Franklin set himself a quest to be perfect which entailed daily ratings of himself on the virtues he considered important. I'm still fascinated by his idea that one could be perfect which seems to reflect a great deal of optimism but it's also a worthy quest to improve oneself. Anyway, when I saw this book inspired by his quest, I wanted to rea [...]

    3. I have been reading this book, slowly, since January. Generally I read one chapter or section in the morning. It has been a lovely way to experience this book, which is about mindfulness and conscious living in general. This book has a very compassionate tone and brings together so many interesting, disparate, inter-connected aspects of every day life. Highly recommended for anyone! Maybe especially those want food for thought.

    4. Teresa Jordan’s The Year of Living Virtuously: Weekends Off) is a series of meditations on life examined through the lens of virtue and vice. Based on an online journal of the same name that Jordan undertook in the fall of 2010, the book uses Benjamin Franklin’s 13 virtues as a starting point. For Jordan, a study of these virtues inevitably led to thoughts on the vices they supposedly counteract, and the book’s direction pivots accordingly. Chapters are named after traditional virtues and [...]

    5. What an interesting book. You learned some history, got to know the author's feelings some and thought about how you are living your own life. This book was more like a compilation of blog entries or magazine articles each chapter which was interesting.

    6. Charming short essays inspired by Benjamin Franklin's writing on virtue, with even more charming illustrations by the author.

    7. I loved this book. I read a piece every morning and allowed the insight to help me focus my day. I would easily recommend this to anyone.

    8. This book really impressed me. Superb writing and thoughtful essays on what it means to have virtues and vices. Highly recommended.

    9. I really enjoyed this little gem; however, it totally wasn't what I bargained for! I thought it would be a book about someone documenting their attempt each workweek to live out certain virtues. Instead, it was a book about a woman's thoughts and musings each week about individual virtues with some vices mixed in. Essentially, it is a collection of the blogs she posted during the year she was living virtuously. Despite the false advertising, I found it to be an uplifting and engrossing read; I f [...]

    10. I find myself unsure of where I stand with this book. On the one hand, I was disappointed. I came into it thinking it would be a collection of the author's experiences and pitfalls with attempting to live these virtues every week. It seems her blog was based on this and from reading the description and title, one would think that this is what the book contained. To be quite honest, it would have probably been a much more interesting book if it had described these experiences. Instead, it serves [...]

    11. A collection of essays, apparently first posted as blog entries. Based on B. Franklin's list of virtues, with a few others added in, each essay begins with an experience of the author's that (sometimes tenuously) ties in to the topic at hand, and then evolves into a meditation on how she defines that virtue. Some of them got a bit boring, I'll admit, but I appreciate the example of really taking the time to think deeply about a subject and make connections from one's own life to help to see it i [...]

    12. I wonder if there's enough books in the vein of "what I tried for a year" to make a whole genre. I don't actively seek these kinds of books, yet flipping through my brain index of nonfiction books I've read in the past few years, there are several that spring to mind: Gretchen Rubin's The Happiness Project, Colin Beavan's No Impact Man, Novella Carpenter's Farm City, Barbara Kingsolver's Animal, Vegetable, Miracle; Joshua Foer's Moonwalking With Einstein. In the case of The Year of Living Virtuo [...]

    13. The author discusses her thoughts/musings around the 12 virtues Ben Franklin attempted to live by (a project he conceived of in his 20s but never really got around toce to know even brilliant people procrastinate.)These include temperance, silence, order, resolution, frugality, industry, sincerity, justice, moderation, cleanliness, tranquility, chastity, and humility. Each chapter covers a different virtue, so it is easy to read a chapter or so before bed.

    14. Much like other readers I had some hope that this was more of direct action and response or reporting of some sort but it's just musings and thoughts. Not that that is a bad thing but there was only the occasional point that stirred a positive response to the writing. I had to force myself through it and sped read the majority.

    15. Excellent in every way. Given our troubled political times a reflection on Franklin and Rand is in order.

    16. Enjoyable read. Great stories, quotes and thought provoking from a person who claims to have no religous faith.

    17. I am a sucker for this kind of book and, while this had some thought-provoking quotes and ideas in common with other books that I have, it is not one of my favorites.

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