Modern Ireland: A Very Short Introduction

Modern Ireland A Very Short Introduction This is a book about the Irish Question or specifically about Irish Questions The term has become something of a catch all a convenient way to encompass numerous issues and developments which pertai

  • Title: Modern Ireland: A Very Short Introduction
  • Author: Senia Paseta
  • ISBN: 9780192801678
  • Page: 214
  • Format: Paperback
  • This is a book about the Irish Question, or specifically about Irish Questions The term has become something of a catch all, a convenient way to encompass numerous issues and developments which pertain to the political, social, and economic history of modern Ireland It is a question which refuses to go away, but it is also a question whose inconstant meaning is rareThis is a book about the Irish Question, or specifically about Irish Questions The term has become something of a catch all, a convenient way to encompass numerous issues and developments which pertain to the political, social, and economic history of modern Ireland It is a question which refuses to go away, but it is also a question whose inconstant meaning is rarely anatomized and still less often denied One of the main aims of this book is to explore the complicated and shifting nature of the Irish Question, and to assess what it has meant to various political minds and agendas The book is arranged both thematically and chronologically each of the eight chapters takes as its focus a particular period, and each period is discussed within the context of one or questions which informed and shaped that particular period About the Series Combining authority with wit, accessibility, and style, Very Short Introductions offer an introduction to some of life s most interesting topics Written by experts for the newcomer, they demonstrate the finest contemporary thinking about the central problems and issues in hundreds of key topics, from philosophy to Freud, quantum theory to Islam

    One thought on “Modern Ireland: A Very Short Introduction”

    1. The Irish are the only example I can think of where only 60 or so years ago they were suffering from the kind of British racism summed up in the famous landlady's sign :And now the situation has reversed so much that British people are constantly claiming they have Irish ancestry and they're naming their kids Ryan, Liam, Callum, Connor, Logan, Finlay, Finn, Aidan and Keiran or Erin, Aoife, Siobhan, Oonagh and Deirdra. It's like reverse-racism. Is that a thing? If it is, the Irish invented it.Iri [...]

    2. Modern Ireland: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions #85), Senia PasetaThis is a book about the Irish Question, or more specifically about Irish Questions. The term has become something of a catch-all, a convenient way to encompass numerous issues and developments which pertain to the political, social, and economic history of modern Ireland. It is a question which refuses to go away, but it is also a question whose inconstant meaning is rarely anatomized and still less often deni [...]

    3. As an American living in Ireland, I am used to getting a single (Republican) telling of Irish history. It was invigorating to read another bias. While the author is not British herself, my Irish friends insist that this version of events stinks of Unionist bias. Well, I suspect the truth lies somewhere in the middle. In any case, I enjoyed the history of the Catholic church's stranglehold on Irish society, and the formation of Ireland's political parties. Read with a skeptical mind.

    4. Another concise, nicely written yet comprehensive member of Oxford's A very Short Introduction collection, this book traces Ireland political and cultural history from the beginning of 19th century, marked by the Act of Union with Britain, to the later half of 20 century, whose representative event was the Troubles. I give this book only 3 stars for two reasons. First, it is not rightly focused, or does not even have any focuses at all. The book covers various movements and events of Ireland thr [...]

    5. 'A very short history of Ireland' is what it says on the tin and that is precisely this book offers. The era covered is 'modern Ireland' so does not go into Vikings and Gallic past but comprehensively touches upon all the milestones in the religious wars (Catholics vs Protestants / Anglicans) and the checkered history and relationship of this nation with England. Quite unbiased in its commentary so quite good as an introduction to Irish history and to try to make sense of (if violence can anytim [...]

    6. The low rating for this book is partly for the text itself, but more importantly, it applies to the Oxford A Very Short Introduction collection as a whole. These texts aren’t introductions, really. They may help to refresh your mind, but on the whole I find that they require a lot of previous knowledge (such as the names of all British Prime Ministers ever, as was the case with this book) that someone who is reading an Introduction may not always have. Intermediate steps between certain events [...]

    7. This is an interesting, mostly political history of Ireland from approximately 1800 to 1922, the years when Ireland was fighting for independence from Great Britain. For myself, I found it hit the sweet spot of assuming just enough but not too much background knowledge It seemed to cover the key figures, it moved along very quickly. Granted, this just gives you a sense of the high points of modern Irish history, but before I read this I didn't have a good grasp of even that. At various points, [...]

    8. While I like the idea of this series and find that this book does cover a lot of ground concisely, I got piqued by its insistent blame sharing. I guess coming from Oxford UP, I shouldn't be surprised, but Paseta refuses to find any group at fault as in this gem of a quote: "Large-scale eviction was not endemic, though it did increase sharply during the Great Famine. It usually took place only when tenants repeatedly refused or were unable to pay their rent." Oh, well, if that's how things "usual [...]

    9. I really like this whole series--take a complex subject, round up a leading scholar and challenge him or her to explain it in about 150 pages. These are invaluable guides to new areas for grad students, with solid bibliographies and structure. In this case, making the last 200 years of Irish social and political history comprehensible is quite the achievement.

    10. We have many books in this series at our library, so I figured I should take a look at this one. It's nice and short, but I still know I won't remember all the dates and different groups that have controlled/influenced Ireland and Northern Ireland. So many of them!

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