A Writer's Coach: An Editor's Guide to Words That Work

A Writer s Coach An Editor s Guide to Words That Work A practical innovative step by step approach to the writing process from one of the most acclaimed writing coaches in the countryIn A Writer s Coach Jack Hart a managing editor at The Oregonian shar

  • Title: A Writer's Coach: An Editor's Guide to Words That Work
  • Author: Jack R. Hart
  • ISBN: 9780375423277
  • Page: 452
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A practical, innovative step by step approach to the writing process from one of the most acclaimed writing coaches in the countryIn A Writer s Coach, Jack Hart a managing editor at The Oregonian shares the wisdom with which he has coached reporters to Pulitzer Prize winning success He gives invaluable advice on gathering ideas, writing theme statements and outlinA practical, innovative step by step approach to the writing process from one of the most acclaimed writing coaches in the countryIn A Writer s Coach, Jack Hart a managing editor at The Oregonian shares the wisdom with which he has coached reporters to Pulitzer Prize winning success He gives invaluable advice on gathering ideas, writing theme statements and outlines, and using the ladder of abstraction to add variety and texture to writing He provides a lexicon of lead sentences He shares his ideas for composing and sustaining powerful writing, and for ensuring that what you write will be accessible to your audience Discussing the ways writers can trip themselves up procrastination, writer s block, and excessive polishing, to name just a few Hart demonstrates how to overcome each obstacle Excerpts from writers such as Ernest Hemingway and Joan Didion, and from articles gathered from magazines and newspapers, provide inspiration and instructive examples of both inadequate and exemplary writing.Like a personal, portable writing coach, A Writer s Coach will be a boon to writers, editors, teachers, and students.

    One thought on “A Writer's Coach: An Editor's Guide to Words That Work”

    1. I would like to have this book loaded on a computer chip and implanted in my brain. Then I could draw on it at will. And as a writer and editor, I would scale mountains and slay dragons and always return home a hero. But such automatic success would eliminate the trying, failing, trying again and succeeding that is so rewarding if you are a writer or editor. You know you'll never know it all, but you keep learning to get as close as you can.So what I'll do is just keep this book nearby. I'll dip [...]

    2. A Writer's Coach teaches you how to improve the substance of your writing. It covers classic, Strunk & White categories like brevity, clarity, and color. But you’ll also learn how to improve the writing process itself. And good news! Going from idea to published piece is about method, not magic.The book is well organized and easy to reference. In addition to an index, Hart provides summaries (“cheat sheets”) at the end of every chapter. He writes with journalists first in mind, but his [...]

    3. It was a dark and stormy night that’s how you should start any good piece of writing, right? This is the type of book that you can keep at your desk as a handy reference guide. It goes wide and covers theme and structure and zooms in with your handy grammar tips and guidelines about creating prose that resonates. With real-life examples, it’s also a really fun read - dare I say laugh out loud at moments? Highly recommend this book for anybody getting serious about writing.

    4. A great book. I reread it everytime I do the final read through on my manuscripts. It's a great refresher that enables me to realign and focus on whether I am clearly and effectively making my point. A great reference for non-fiction writers.

    5. It was dumb luck I stumbled upon Jack Hart's book, A Writer's Coach (Pantheon Books 2006). I couldn't afford to hire an editor for my novel, but knew it needed help. There are hundreds (thousands?) of self-help books on this topic, so how was I to pick the one that would work for me? I personally own over a dozen, including Lukeman's First Five Pages, several by Donald Maass and several more by James Frey. While I did want one that specialized in self-editing, I also have quite a few of those--i [...]

    6. Another must-read book for writers (and those with lurking ambitions to make it as a writer in a very competitive world that tends to put down outsiders and beginners---unless you're lucky, persistent, disciplined and focused with your goals), this book hopefully will help you on improving your efforts to sharpen your tools in your craft continuously. After reading this, I'm beginning to believe that I have to keep on reading and understanding inputs from books like this so that I'll improve my [...]

    7. Jack Hart’s A Writer's Coach: An Editor's Guide to Words That Work is one of the best books on writing I have read. It is to the point, elegant, and has a lot of useful information packed into its pages. Most importantly, it is written in a way that is accessible and modern so that a reader feels like he or she is speaking with the writer. A Writer’s Coach is a welcome addition to any budding or professional writer, regardless of the genre being written.Some of the material covered in this l [...]

    8. A Writer’s Coach by Jack Hart, Pantheon Books This book assumes that you want to read up on all of the components of writing. In approximately 270 pages Jack Hart covers everything from the method of writing on through the actual mechanics of thee process.I bought this book, like many others, because as a younger person I failed to recognize the importance of being able to write correctly. I still struggle, but, with continued help, I believe I am getting better. One of the reasons is this boo [...]

    9. "Excellent"This is a wonderful book for anyone who is interested in having their writing skill improved. Lots of useful insights and hints on how to make your words, sentences, and paragraphs more powerful and refreshing. Useful examples, humorous comments. Although Hart talks about the art of writing mainly from a journalist's point of view, many of the advices are applicable for various types of writing. Funny enough that it is the opposite of the indirect and passive approach scientists took [...]

    10. Jack Hart did it well. He tells, and mostly shows, how a fine writing is done without unnecessary pain. Emphasised in journalism, his practical and humorous wit strikes most of writing features, from idea generation to the art of fine-tuning. I wish I had had read it at the beginning of my bachelor study. Get a copy soon. Your writing will never be the same!

    11. Not a lot of new material if you've read other writing advice books, but it's organized well, and the first section, on organizing (non-fiction) writing projects before you start drafting is very good. Weirdly, organization and process are often neglected in this sort of book, so it's nice to see them treated well.

    12. Wonderfully informative book on writing. Particularly helpful with editing. Full of examples for each of the author’s recommendations. One of the few books that I believe are worth owning in hardback. I want to highlight and underline and “star” to my heart’s content.

    13. A first-rate, practical guide full of helpful tips and examples. Although it's mainly aimed at journalists this book will help anybody improve their writing. I found it less dated (and sexist) than Zinsser and more focused on the writing process (rather than just on polishing your style).

    14. Well-written guide to writing, full of examples for every topic of import from color to clarity to process with helpful snapshots at the end of each chapter to review key pointsHaving completed this book, I should have composed an eloquent review.

    15. This book had some good information in it. I checked it out from the library and took a few notes since I couldn't highlight and tab it up like I do with my own books, but I'd recommend it to other writers.

    16. This book provides tips for journalists, but I enjoyed the sections on force and brevity. I noticed an immediate improvement in my writing.

    17. This was recommended to me by the A&E editor and Seven Weekly. It's got a lot of excellent and practical writing strategies for freelancers and journalists.

    18. Worthwhile, useful. The chapters on brevity and force were thorough and direct; it would be good to have this on hand.

    19. Maybe I have been reading too many "how to" books on writing. I didn't feel this one added much and it only deals with journalistic writing.

    20. This is the best book I've ever read on the craft of writing. And I've read Zinsser. Hart offers wisdom that can immediately improve your ability to put words on the page.

    21. Very detailed tips on how to write well. The examples are good. But no major breakthrough ideas and so it was below my expectations.

    22. Great advice from one of the country's foremost writing coaches (at The Oregonian). Super readable. Makes tons of sense.

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