The Lost World of Scripture: Ancient Literary Culture and Biblical Authority

The Lost World of Scripture Ancient Literary Culture and Biblical Authority Readers Choice Awards Honorable Mention Preaching s Preacher s Guide to the Best Bible Reference for Scripture Hermeneutics From John H Walton author of the bestselling Lost World of Genesi

  • Title: The Lost World of Scripture: Ancient Literary Culture and Biblical Authority
  • Author: John H. Walton D. Brent Sandy
  • ISBN: 9780830840328
  • Page: 176
  • Format: Paperback
  • 2014 Readers Choice Awards Honorable Mention Preaching s Preacher s Guide to the Best Bible Reference for 2014 Scripture Hermeneutics From John H Walton, author of the bestselling Lost World of Genesis One, and D Brent Sandy, author of Plowshares and Pruning Hooks, comes a detailed look at the origins of scriptural authority in ancient oral cultures and how they infor2014 Readers Choice Awards Honorable Mention Preaching s Preacher s Guide to the Best Bible Reference for 2014 Scripture Hermeneutics From John H Walton, author of the bestselling Lost World of Genesis One, and D Brent Sandy, author of Plowshares and Pruning Hooks, comes a detailed look at the origins of scriptural authority in ancient oral cultures and how they inform our understanding of the Old and New Testaments today Stemming from questions about scriptural inerrancy, inspiration and oral transmission of ideas, The Lost World of Scripture examines the process by which the Bible has come to be what it is today From the reasons why specific words were used to convey certain ideas to how oral tradition impacted the transmission of biblical texts, the authors seek to uncover how these issues might affect our current doctrine on the authority of Scripture In this book we are exploring ways God chose to reveal his word in light of discoveries about ancient literary culture, write Walton and Sandy Our specific objective is to understand better how both the Old and New Testaments were spoken, written and passed on, especially with an eye to possible implications for the Bible s inspiration and authority.

    One thought on “The Lost World of Scripture: Ancient Literary Culture and Biblical Authority”

    1. I was impressed with John Walton's books on the Genesis creation accounts. So I decided to read this book on biblical authority that he co-authored with Brent Sandy. Like with his books on the creation accounts, the authors take a close look at the literary culture in the Ancient Near East and then use that to evaluate the traditional way that evangelicals approach biblical authority and inerrancy. Also like Walton's creation account books, this book is structured as a set of propositions that b [...]

    2. Review: This book has a lot in common with Denis Lamoureux's Evolutionary Creation, but without the focus on evolution. They both approach the Old Testament by recognizing that God is accommodating scripture to the culture and worldview of people living in the Ancient Near East. Our task is to discern the cultural package from the eternal contents, and this is not easily done without careful study. Lamoureux calls this the Message/Incident principle, and Walton refers to Locution/Illocution/Perl [...]

    3. Walton and Sandy give a helpful and detailed look into the oral-dominant world in which the Bible originated and shows how many Christians, both through critical scholarship and fundamentalist apologetics, have anachronistically imposed our modern/Western text-dominant modes of thought onto it. It's difficult for people of a text-dominant culture to put ourselves into the mindset of an oral-dominant culture, but Walton and Sandy are very helpful in this regard. Through the use of Speech-Act Theo [...]

    4. There is a LOT to pull from this book, and the claims the co-authors are making are not insignificant. These claims are remarkably well-argued, though, which makes it an indispensable read. John Walton contributes the chapters on Old Testament composition, and while I did enjoy these (I particularly love some of Walton's other work on Genesis), I was extremely impressed by newcomer Brent Sandy's chapters on the New Testament texts. I've always heard pastors/teachers say things like, "these stori [...]

    5. Everyone loves a good story of discovery. Whether it is in the pages of a good book or watching Indiana Jones on the big screen, people love to be drawn into the discovery of lost artifacts, and even more so, lost worlds. The field of archeology, and its attending fields, has unearthed artifacts, buried tombs, treasures and entire villages and cities that give us a glimpse into the lives and ways of the people and civilizations of the ancient past. It many ways, we are discovering things and wor [...]

    6. Walton and Sandy’s book is a reexamination of the evangelical doctrines of inerrancy and biblical authority in light of current research in ancient literary production. Specifically, their objective is “to understand better how both the Old and New Testaments were spoken, written, and passed on, especially with an eye to possible implications for the Bible’s inspiration and authority” (9). This wide scope limits the depth of the book so that each of its twenty-four chapters rarely recei [...]

    7. Was tempted to rate lower - because I still have so many questions. Way more than when I started. But, I suppose that is how this thing works. "We are misinformed readers when we use the Bible for purposes that exceed its intents." This was a fantastic book that radically moved my understanding of scripture. Many of these things were floating around in the back of my mind, but this analysis provided all the scholarly work and insight that I was sorely lacking, and will certainly help to elevate [...]

    8. This should be read by new students in biblical studies. The emphasis on oral it’s in the development of Scripture is compelling. I’m not fully convinced on moving inerrancy totally to illocution, but Walton and Sandy make a strong argument toward that end. Even when I disagree, I admit the book makes a good argument. I recommend this book for students in biblical studies and pastors.

    9. This is a book which will challenge an Evangelical's preconceived ideas. It certainly has mine. The authors make a convincing case for the contents of the Bible having been first proclaimed orally, not in written form, by drawing on Ancient Near Eastern, Greek and Roman customs. This has implications for the way in which we observe how a message is maintained and transmitted. The stories themselves (locutions) are less important than the message the speaker / author desired his aural audience to [...]

    10. A very, very challenging book, not only for its primary intended readers (conservative Christians) but also for any Liberals who may be humble enough to learn from fundamentalists.I mentioned fundamentalism in the original sense: this is primary a book for fundamentalists adhering to Biblical inerrancy but wanting a better definition of it, and understanding of the Bible, based on Scripture’s original cultural context, including the role of orality in the genesis of texts and in their transmis [...]

    11. The two or three months took to finish this book is a relatively long time (I usually read books in a single sitting). If reading a popular level book is like wading along the seashore, going through this book was like going deep sea diving. The immense depth of content often left me amazed as I realised how naive my presuppositions were and how so far removed I am from the context of the world that Scripture was written in.Walton and Sandy have indeed done a fine job in "not to deconstruct iner [...]

    12. Well worth the time. Approaches scripture with a high view of its authority but makes use of speech-act theory to help clarify where the authority lies. (Speech act theory breaks down text into locution, what is said, illocution, what is intended -bless, promise, command -, and perlocution, the intended response). Walton lodge authority of scripture in the illocution-a reasonable approach. He also writes extensively on the orality of scripture. All scripture was first given and transmitted orall [...]

    13. The world was oral for a very long time. Even when some could read and write, it was not common among regular people.

    14. I was very much intrigued by Walton's "THe Lost World of Genesis 1" which says in short that the chapters of Genesis 1-3 are more about the purposes or functions of the material universe than their origin. I am not sure I buy it all, but was very supported that a great deal, maybe the majority of the purpose of those chapters were to help us see our relationship to the world in which we live, and the purpose for humanity. This work deals with the nature of scripture that arose from an oral cultu [...]

    15. An Important Message for Fundamentalists on Both SidesThat so many today read the bible and take each and every word literally, whether to hold it high or tear it down, is a huge problem in today's literary-based culture. The literary paradigm from which we view the bible would have been alien to those who lived in the times that the Old and New Testament were transmitted. Walton's third book in his Lost World Series shows how the nature of the oral culture in effect allows the bible to withstan [...]

    16. This took a long time to read properly, and I made a lot of notes. It was a very thought-provoking book. I was attracted to it because I have some knowledge of culture that is primarily or exclusively based around oral communication, (I work for a cross-cultural mission agency).My reaction on hearing of it was to have a "doh" forehead-slapping moment! I have thought a lot about how oral based cultures work, but not about the fact that our literate (and post-literate) cultures are essentially for [...]

    17. If you are interested in the doctrine of the inerrancy of the Bible and are ready for a somewhat higher level (but every understandable) book, you’ll find this a fascinating foray into the background of how ancient documents were created. Part of the problem that Walton and Sandy take up is that the ancient world didn’t think of authors the way we do in the 21st century. Nor did they think of books in the same way we do. And we are wrong to anachronistically impose our categories and expecta [...]

    18. This book has five-star content, but it felt slightly repetitive at times, perhaps due to there being more than one author. The theological concept of inerrancy is not an easy one to challenge, as the mere suggestion of non-adherence can get oneself labeled as a heretic. While traversing the topic of inerrancy can be a bit of a tightrope walk, the authors do an excellent job of retaining the theological idea while jettisoning Modernist baggage that has inadvertently been attached by the church o [...]

    19. A pretty wonderful book. I'm not quite sure they pulled off the level of accessibility the authors sought, but then again it's a difficult subject to both treat well and treat with accessibility. Walton and Sandy seem to nestle in to an academic Evangelicalism that affirms the inerrancy of scripture by redefining inerrancy in a context that's more responsible to the literary roots of the writings we have in the Bible. They seem to be fending off fundamentalism on one front, New Atheism on anothe [...]

    20. This book answered many of the theological questions I've been asking for years! It's an academic work that won't appeal to everyone (and I found it at times quite wordy), but it certainly squared with what we know about ancient cultures and the transmission of revelatory/prophetic experiences of God through the generations. An incredibly helpful contribution to the debates and discussions around the nature of inspiration and the Scriptures.

    21. A stimulating and insightful exploration of the authority of God's revelation in relation to ancient culture. Well worth reading and pondering.

    22. Livre permettant de comprendre comment les textes anciens se formaient dans les sociétés non littéraire.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *