Story of a Death Foretold: The Coup Against Salvador Allende, September 11, 1973

Story of a Death Foretold The Coup Against Salvador Allende September On September President Salvador Allende of Chile was deposed in a violent coup led by General Augusto Pinochet The coup had been in the works for months even years Shortly after giving a fa

  • Title: Story of a Death Foretold: The Coup Against Salvador Allende, September 11, 1973
  • Author: Oscar Guardiola-Rivera
  • ISBN: 9781608198962
  • Page: 150
  • Format: Hardcover
  • On September 11, 1973, President Salvador Allende of Chile was deposed in a violent coup led by General Augusto Pinochet The coup had been in the works for months, even years Shortly after giving a farewell speech to his people, Allende died of gunshot wounds whether inflicted by his own hand or an assassin s remains uncertain Pinochet ruled Chile for a quarter century,On September 11, 1973, President Salvador Allende of Chile was deposed in a violent coup led by General Augusto Pinochet The coup had been in the works for months, even years Shortly after giving a farewell speech to his people, Allende died of gunshot wounds whether inflicted by his own hand or an assassin s remains uncertain Pinochet ruled Chile for a quarter century, but the short rise and bloody fall of Allende is still the subject of fierce historical debate.In a world in the throes of the Cold War, the seeming backwater of Chile became the host of a very hot conflict with Henry Kissinger and the Western establishment aligned with Pinochet s insurgents against a socialist coalition of students, workers, Pablo Neruda, and folk singers, led by the brilliant ideologue Allende Revolution and counterrevolution played out in graphic detail, moving the small South American nation to the center of the world stage in the dramatic autumn of 1973 Now the rising young scholar Oscar Guardiola Rivera gives us a tour de force account of a historical crossroads, tracing the destiny of democracy, and the paths of power, money, and violence that still shadow Latin America and its relations with the United States.

    One thought on “Story of a Death Foretold: The Coup Against Salvador Allende, September 11, 1973”

    1. Colombian journalist Guardiola-Rivera has written the first full history of Chile's coup in English. He covers Chile's history back to early 20th century showing how a coalition of Mapuche Indians, copper miners and youth set up Allende's election win in 1970. What is also clear is that this win was doomed. A program of sabotage started within the Chilean military and funded by the CIA began immediately. The hatred of Allende's program wasn't merely political for those on the right it was also a [...]

    2. I'm torn on this book. On the one hand, I find the historical narrative of Chile's political environment and the subsequent coup to be a fascinating story that needs to be told. On the other, the author gets completely bogged down at times by going off on repetitive philosophical tangents that seem fascinated with their own grandiosity and offer little of interest in the way of insight. Honestly, this book could have been 1/2 to 2/3 the length if it had maintained a tighter focus on the events a [...]

    3. This is a thrilling tale about the consciousness of an entire society, the bystander effect and the challenge between societal thought and human consciousness. It is a philosophical investigation of the depth of the human and societal soul and its darkest secrets. Its characters and plot lines are complex and realistic: Highly recommended.

    4. Really great account of what led up to the coup, the coup itself, and a brief summary of what followed. If you're interested in Chilean history, US meddling, or socialism, definitely read this!

    5. I was very much looking forward to reading this book. On one hand, I enjoyed it, but on the other, I think it could have been so much better.The author captured and reported on the larger context of the overthrow of the democratically elected leftist president of Chile. I was familiar with the story, but that didn't temper my anger as I worked through each phase of the effort to oust Salvadore Allende. The US, like it had done in Iran and Guatemala before, worked overtly and covertly to subvert [...]

    6. There is nothing that isn’t sad about the overthrow of Chile’s Salvador Allende, a democrat who, because he was also a socialist, couldn’t be allowed to remain in power by the United States. With Latin and South America, you can pick a lot of horrible meddling by the U.S. (the Spanish-American War, the coup against Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala, the Cuban embargo) but Allende’s overthrow may top the list.This book is as much of a call to action as a history of what happened, which was a tur [...]

    7. I was unsure how to rate this (3 or 4 stars), because while there were many passages of brilliance in here, paragraphs that made me want to yell "yessssss!" thanks to the way Guardiola-Rivera connected events of the past and present in a succinct and well-pointed way, there were other sections that were a bit of a slog. I've read books of a similar length and scope which included a dramatis personae at the front of the book for easy reference, and I think such a device might have benefited this [...]

    8. Voor dit boek is wel enige interesse in politieke geschiedenis en dan vooral die van Latijns Amerika nodig. Het is goed geschreven en gaat, kort gezegd, over de verkiezing van Allende als president van Chili in 1970 en daarna in 1973 de coupe door Pinochet met steun van de Amerikanen. Vooral datlaatste is eenuiterst cynisch verhaal. Je kunt je bijna niet voorstellen, dat de Amerikanen daarmee weg kwamen. Maar waarschijnlijk gebeuren dit soort dingen nog steeds. Behalve het verhaal van Allende ge [...]

    9. I was looking for a book about the 1973 coup in Chile. The author does briefly discuss the facts of the coup, but that discussion is buried in lengthy discussions of leftist philosophies which I did not find helpful in understanding the events of 1973. If I had wanted a book about Sartre or Bertrand Russell, I would have bought a book specific to them and their writings. This book would have been infinitely better if the author had written a true history of the coup instead of trying to write a [...]

    10. Tells the detailed story of the rise of Salvador Allende to power in Chile, the forces that were deadest against his vision and ultimately his policies and how they used both legitimate and questionable methods to bring about his downfall.It sheds further light on the cold war mindset that made freedom and the sovereignty of nations secondary to ideological and geopolitical considerations. It also showed how that mindset combined with forces within the country to thwart democracy and ensure that [...]

    11. A slight disappointment as I find the coup that overthrew Chilean president Salvador Allende in 1973 a fascinating period of history. The problem here is too much research and information about the minutiae of Chilean politics in the 20th century leading up to the coup. Therefore, by the time we get to the event itself, it falls a bit flat.Allende himself comes across as a strong and principled character who refused to adopt the mantle of Marxist dictator and meet violence with violence. The rol [...]

    12. The author doesn't just chronicle "the first 9/11," he also places the sad tale into a global, and non-first-world, context. For example, he emphasizes the "northern" view, popular in U.S. government and corporate circles, that "history doesn't happen in the south." This book is a difficult read, however, because of the (often over-) complicated and tangled syntax: sometimes the subject of a sentence is six lines long.

    13. You need a pretty sizable background in Chilean, and European history to get the full effect of this book. Some parts are a slog to get through, but are important in setting up others. Then, other parts of the book are brilliant.

    14. I read this because I realized I didn't know a whole lot about what was happening in Chile. I remembered Orlando Letelier being assassinated in D.C. in the '80's but not understanding the context. This book has all the context and more, but the style is a little turgid and pedantic.

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