Six Questions of Socrates: A Modern-Day Journey of Discovery through World Philosophy

Six Questions of Socrates A Modern Day Journey of Discovery through World Philosophy What is virtue What is moderation What is justice What is courage What is good What is piety Socrates thought that understanding the perspectives of others on these six great questions would help him

  • Title: Six Questions of Socrates: A Modern-Day Journey of Discovery through World Philosophy
  • Author: Christopher Phillips
  • ISBN: 9780393326796
  • Page: 347
  • Format: Paperback
  • What is virtue What is moderation What is justice What is courage What is good What is piety Socrates thought that understanding the perspectives of others on these six great questions would help him become a excellent human being Following in Socrates s footsteps, Christopher Phillips Johnny Appleseed with a master s degree Utne Reader investigates these sWhat is virtue What is moderation What is justice What is courage What is good What is piety Socrates thought that understanding the perspectives of others on these six great questions would help him become a excellent human being Following in Socrates s footsteps, Christopher Phillips Johnny Appleseed with a master s degree Utne Reader investigates these same questions, beginning in the marketplace of modern day Athens He goes on to investigate the timely responses and outlooks of people from different cultures and backgrounds around the world from Greece and Spain to Japan and Korea, Mexico City, and Chiapas, where the region s indigenous people struggle for fundamental human rights Phillips also traveled throughout the United States, holding dialogues in diverse communities from New York City to the Navajo Nation Introducing us to less familiar thinkers in non Western traditions who were kindred spirits of Socrates, Phillips enlarges our perspectives on life s fundamental questions, creating an innovative world survey of philosophy.

    One thought on “Six Questions of Socrates: A Modern-Day Journey of Discovery through World Philosophy”

    1. Sometimes with philosophy books you don't know what you're getting. You can get either an arcane and stuffy book that boasts about its lofty wisdom, or you can get a down-to-earth book that's thought provoking for the average reader. This book falls into the latter category. The book basically centers around 6 ancient questions asked by Socrates himself. These questions are; what is virtue? what is justice? what is courage? what is good? what is piety? and what is moderation? Phillips has appare [...]

    2. This book should be required reading in college. It's not a classic but it is a remedy for the insular, often predjudiced thinking of many Americans. On the other hand, it is a remedy for the sheltered or disengaged. It also provdes a revolutionary model of education and dialogue. It is a great book for any thinking person as well as for anyone who needs to think a little more.

    3. It's interesting that the author, who leads Socratic discussion groups all over the world, has so many demographics with which to work. My own Socrates Cafe is but one kind. We are white adults, some retired, some not, and we meet once a month. Our topics are generally chosen ahead and so everyone knows what to talk about. We are lively, but respectful, and we try to keep philosophy alive.

    4. Following up on his bestselling book, Socrates Café, Christopher Phillips delivers another serving of practical philosophy. In Six Questions of Socrates, Phillips discusses the original six questions asked by Socrates in Plato’s “Dialogues”: What is virtue? What is moderation? What is justice? What is courage? What is good? And what is piety? Phillips shares his thoughts on these questions, along with the viewpoints of numerous others who participated in discussions. As with all the books [...]

    5. I loved this book. The premise of the book is simple: Phillips travels around the world, asking different groups of people six questions: What is justice? What is good? What is courage? What is moderation? What is virtue? and What is piety? Far from mundane, their responses are illuminating and thought-provoking. New Yorker's interviewed shortly after the 9/11 attacks speak to justice. Patients with severe mental illness discuss courage. I came away from this book both with an appreciation for t [...]

    6. Yup, decided it was only OK. Maybe it was b/c I actually took a couple philosophy classes in college, but this book seemed pretty elementary to me. Basically, you are reading dialogues from various groups of people around the world, which are their responses to the 6 classic questions of Socrates. I didn't find any of their own philosophies and notions particularly insightful nor intriguing. Sigh. If you published comments from high school/beginning college philo class discussions from around th [...]

    7. I found the cultural aspects of this book much more interesting than the philosophy. It was fascinating to see the similarities, and differences, of people so far removed from one another. As for the questions of Socrates and the pursuit of excellence, I couldn't help wondering "What for?" It seems to be taken as basic assumption that this should be the ultimate human endeavour, without exploring why.

    8. I found it a difficult read because it was so open-ended. The author interviewed people of various cultures which resulted in a wide variety of interpretations of the questions at hand without any definite conclusions. Then again, this may be what he intended. I think this book would make a good basis for a group discussion. Perhaps I should read "Socrates Cafe."

    9. Author Phillips travels around the world, asking people the same questions Socrates asked. Nice premise for a book. Somehow, I imagine the actual experiences of meeting with the groups were a lot more fun than what is presented in the book. Why is it sometimes you can't capture that zing in a book?

    10. I enjoyed how the author introduced different cultures and mindsets in the book. The opinions that are put forward come from people of different mindsets and upbringing and allowed me gain some insights.

    11. Good questions and good methods. The groups represented in the book are heavily weighted toward non-Western and political activist. It wasn't what I was looking for, for my spiritually focused reading group. We need to hold our own Socrates Cafe to relate it to our own issues.

    12. author goes to some very different places to get very different mindsets for discussionsill feel more could have been discussed but good starting point for starting your own socrates cafe like he wanted. good basic background info etc.

    13. This book is a followup to SOCRATES CAFE and generates a lot of thought. I liked to read it a few pages at a time. It provides insight into other cultures while prompting an evaluation of one's own culture. I've run out of time for now, so I've only completed 3 of the 6 questions.

    14. Simple, clear thinking in a novel approach to lovely old premises. I will use this one with my students next year. Phillips is a divine thinker. I'm adding him as a favorite author so I can see what he does next!

    15. Great live conversations of some of the main concepts of some of Socrates' dialogues. Helpful in conjunction with textbook for Philosophy

    16. This is a fantastic book to use with students. My English counterpart and I used it to integrate modern and Ancient World History & Literature. It worked perfectly and the students loved it!

    17. Ponders upon the six main questions Socrates acknowledged (i.e. What is piety? What is truth?) in a more current view. Highly recommend.

    18. Fantastic. Really made me want to participate in a Socrates Cafe. The casual, conversational style was enjoyable. The information well presented.

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