The Conquest of the Incas (2012 Edition)

The Conquest of the Incas Edition On September a force of weary Spanish explorers cut through the forests of Panama and were confronted by an ocean the Mar del Sur or the Pacific Ocean Six years later the Spaniards had estab

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  • Title: The Conquest of the Incas (2012 Edition)
  • Author: John Hemming
  • ISBN: 9780957111646
  • Page: 379
  • Format: ebook
  • On 25 September 1513, a force of weary Spanish explorers cut through the forests of Panama and were confronted by an ocean the Mar del Sur, or the Pacific Ocean Six years later the Spaniards had established the town of Panama as a base from which to explore and exploit this unknown sea It was the threshold of a vast expansion.The Conquest of the Incas, John Hemming s maOn 25 September 1513, a force of weary Spanish explorers cut through the forests of Panama and were confronted by an ocean the Mar del Sur, or the Pacific Ocean Six years later the Spaniards had established the town of Panama as a base from which to explore and exploit this unknown sea It was the threshold of a vast expansion.The Conquest of the Incas, John Hemming s masterly and highly acclaimed account of one of the most exciting conquests known to history, has never been surpassed From the first small band of Spanish adventurers to enter the mighty Inca empire to the execution of the last Inca forty years later, it is the story of bloodshed, infamy, rebellion and extermination, told as convincingly as if it happened yesterday It also tells the social impact of the conquest, on ordinary Peruvians forced to work for Spanish masters or in hellish silver and mercury mines, on change of religion and government, and how survivors of the Inca elite reacted to the new order.This 2012 e book edition includes an extensive revision and update of the text, bibliography, notes and other end material, to report the latest theories and discoveries It also has a new appendix about recent finds of Inca ruins in Vilcabamba.A must read book for anyone considering a trip to Peru or wanting to know about the final days of the Inca empire.More information available The Conquest of the Incas is an extraordinary book In it, rigorous historical research and profound analysis combine with stylistic elegance to produce a work that conveys to us, in all its richness and diversity, the tragic and fabulous history of the Inca realm it is as delightful to read as the best novels Mario Vargas LlosaPeruvian Nobel Laureate for Literature For South American scholars, visitors to Peru, or any adventurer, The Conquest of the Incas by John Hemming is an unmatched must read book it has inspired a generation of scholars working in the Andes Professor Brian S BauerUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoLeading Inca archaeologist It is distinguished by an extraordinary empathy, a feeling of one s way into the minds of the 16th century Spaniards and Indians it seizes hold of the imagination It tells a dirty story It makes you wonder why It should be read John LeonardNew York Times It is a delight to praise a book of this quality which combines careful scholarship with sparkling narrative skill his works brims with fresh facts and insights Philip MagnusThe Sunday Times A superbly vivid history distinguished by formidable scholarship, uncluttered language, a graphic sense of the craggy or desolate terrain in which the tragic combat took place Dennis PotterThe Times A mountain of a book but there is nothing arduous about the reading of it the hard work has all been done by John Hemming It is a superb work of narrative history Antonia FraserFinancial Times To read Hemming s Conquest was to be taken by a tireless traveler, scholar and expert guide through the deserts, mountains and jungles in which the tragic conflict raged Every description rang with the authority of one who had spent time there and read everything which both sides had to say Ronald WrightTimes Literary SupplementMore information available.

    One thought on “The Conquest of the Incas (2012 Edition)”

    1. Just about everyone knows about how Francisco Pizarro, the illiterate conquistador, captured the Inca Atahualpa, demanded a king's ransom in gold and silver, and put his prisoner to death anyway. But that is only the beginning of the tale. The Incas rebelled under Manco Inca and retreated to Vilcabamba, from which they ran a truncated version of their society until they were finally defeated by the Spanish decades later. John Hemming tells the whole story in Conquest of the Incas, from both the [...]

    2. If like me you only had an approximate idea of what the Spanish conquest of what is modern Peru meant for the local population, this book will shock you. The extent of the harassment and exploitation to which refined, modern Spaniards subjected the Indios surpasses imagination, especially as it is coupled with a hefty amount of hypocrisy: religious committees and even the Pope giving their blessing to what turned out to be mistreatment and downright abuse of the locals as well as pillaging of th [...]

    3. "Conquest of the Incas" is certainly one of the finest--perhaps the finest--large-scale Historical study I have ever read. It has a remarkable precision of detail, depth of analysis, and epic scope that make it difficult to put down. And always we see the human element--the odd combination of religiosity and hideous greed of the conquistadors, the equally strange mixture of contempt for the Indians and a willingness to exploit them as well as a paternalistic concern for their welfare in Viceroy [...]

    4. As Peruvian it was painful to read this episode in the history of my country. Specially since I am familiar with all the places mentioned in the book. As a reader I think this is a superb piece of work. Read it

    5. A truly well-researched and balanced look at the Spanish conquest of Peru that treated the conquered Incas as a noble people and shined a light on both the atrocities and few glimmers of goodness from the Spaniards. Hemming's account explored the best theories of pre-conquest time through the final vestiges of Incan family lines. It was a surprisingly easy to read (though not fast) despite all of the accounts and literature he must have combed through. His accounts of the various leaders that tr [...]

    6. This is an extremely well researched book and should be read by any visitor to Peru. It tells of the tragic demise of the amazing Inca civilization at the hands of the Spanish Conquistadors. In the 16th Century: The cruelty the deception, the bravery and violence and the looting and destruction of priceless gold and silver works of art, and the huge loss of the Inca kings and their Empire. Interesting are the final chapters detailing the searches in the 20th Century to discover explain and map t [...]

    7. The Conquest of the Incas makes for rather grim reading, even more so than the conquest of Mexico. If any event contributed to the Leyenda Negra it was this, owing to its chaotic nature and opportunities for low level roguery, as well as the institutionalized cruelty that was an inevitable consequence of the rich silver mines in the area, given Spain's ambitions and economy at the time which entirely overrode the concerns raised by its humanist intellectuals. It's the story of a people's hopeles [...]

    8. I read this shortly after visiting Peru and more than anything it made me want to return to explore the country more as well as the rest of South America. The detailed account of the Spanish conquest of the Incas leaves nary a stone unturned in capturing the sequence of events that resulted in the invaders emerging as victors and stamping their mark on the face of the country. It was more complex than I imagined; I guess history always is. It is easy to picture the Conquistadors galloping throug [...]

    9. Detailed, thorough, rigorously researched, and extraordinary, this is the BEST book I've read about the Incas. How difficult it is to imagine what drove Francisco Pizarro except a quest for fame! The illegitimate son of a military officer, Pizarro was born in a barren area called Extremadura, about 140 miles from Madrid. Interestingly, this area is known as "the cradle of most of the leading conquistadores." Males born into poor circumstances in fifteenth-century Spain had the choice of marrying [...]

    10. Two weeks till the Harmon Siblings travel to Peru - read up and ready.A thorough account of the conquest of the Peruvian Inca Empire by the Spanish Pizzaro brothers. Poor Incas - a typical battle with the Spanish Conquistadors would read something like: 150 Conquistadors went to fight the Incas. Eleven Spaniards were injured, one Spaniard and two horses were killed3,000 Incas perished. I can't imagine how the Inca felt - one day a vastly superior alien race just shows up and all that you know be [...]

    11. The Incas and the conquest of Peru are two of the most interesting stories in Latin American history. This book captures the whole of that story and in wonderful detail relates the invasion of Pizzaro and the fall of the Incas. From Manco Inca to Tuti Cosi the Inca rebellions raged against Spanish occupation and eventually resulted in the free Inca state of Villacamba. In the end this state was doomed to fall to Spanish greed but the attempts at the Incas to preserve sovereignty is impressive. T [...]

    12. Bought an old version on for About $2. When I got it I saw how old it looked and set it aside for a year (thinking I would never be interested). I picked it up before I trip to Peru and was very surprised and how concise and well told the story is. It's a great story with good academic credentials, written in 1970 when a lot of the myths of the Inca's (Machu Pichu erroneously being confused as the last holdout of the Inca's, which it wasn't) still abounded. Highly recommend for people intereste [...]

    13. This is a massive work of history, accurate as I can guess it and as history will ever be (i.e. never count on it, it's always a point of view)I liked it a lot, especially reading it prior to my Peruvian holiday it was a great read.Only it's sheer size and detail proved to be a burden as it became impossible of tracing every person, place and story throughout with the book covering such a long time-frame and such tumultuous times.

    14. Stephen Hawking recently said something along the lines that if aliens were to invade us they wouldn't be friendly, they would be more like the Europeans who came to the new world. When he said that he must have been thinking about the Spanish Conquistadors and their brutal invasion of Peru. This book gives a detailed, shocking account of not only how the Spanish conquered the Incas - despite being vastly outnumbered - but also the brutality and greed that came after. The conquistadors may have [...]

    15. This is a pretty good overview for people who know virtually nothing about the Inca Empire and how it was conquered by the Spanish conquistadors under Francisco Pizarro. It spans the entire 40 years between the Spaniards first contact with the Incas and the destruction of the independent state of Vilcabamba, where the last Inca, Manco, fled after a failed insurrection against the Spanish. During that period there was fighting between Spanish and Inca forces, but also internal struggles between I [...]

    16. A very scholarly book about the Spanish conquest of Peru. It details the activities of Pizarro and his generals on their march through the Inca lands, the capture of the Inca and subsequent activities as they subdued the entire population in a short time. The plethora of details make for slow going, but the book gives an excellent picture of what took place and is based on written accounts by the Spanish involved as well as Inca records of the time.

    17. An excellent book on the history of the inca and their conquest by the Spanish in the 16th century. As someone who went in with very little knowledge of the events I never felt out of my depth which was great, and enjoyed the author's own personal recollections of exploring ruins in the . My only complaint is that I felt there could have been more background on some of the conquistadors, but apart from that the amount of detail was good.

    18. History writing at its best: an author who clearly engages with his subject on many levels and releases a stream of intriguing facts embedded in limpid prose; nearly 50 years old and not bettered in its field, nor,more generally, as accessible writing for the generalist audience. A beautifully made book too, gorgeous typeface, lovely binding.

    19. Excellent ReadIf you really want to know about the conquests of Peru, read this book. It undoubtedly will contain much more than any one person can absorb. However, the manner in which the history us told is fascinating.

    20. “'We assume that Your Majesty has not been informed of this, since you have not ordered that it be remedied. For it is so contrary to divine and natural law that free men should be forced and compelled to such excessive labour, so prejudicial to their health and lives.'”

    21. Автор надзвичайно глибоко дослідив давню цивілізацію інків, описав походи та завоювання іспанських конкістадорів Пісарро, Бекалькасара, Альварадо. Чудові ілюстрації.

    22. An amazing book. Although it was written 44 years ago, John Hemming's ''The conquest of the Incas'' is still the definitive account of the Spanish conquest of Peru in the 16th century. The story of the conquest is both astonishing and horrible, and Hemming tells it well. The conquest of the Incas was a first-contact clash of civilizations. The Incas and Spaniards didn't know each other when their first real encounter in Cajamarca in November 1532 almost immediately sealed the fate of the Incas. [...]

    23. A thorough, scholarly look at the history and causes of the collapse of the Incas.Hemming does a good job of portraying the laudable and the baser motives of both sides in the conflict. I appreciated the fact that he did not fall into the PC trap of -- dare I say brownwashing? -- the indigenous people of the Andes.Certainly the world would be better off had the conquistadors recorded and preserved the Incan culture, but the Incans were themselves recent conquerors of much of their empire when th [...]

    24. As I worked through the book, I wrestled with what to rate it. It does an incredible job of telling the story of the conquest of the Incan Empire, a subject I knew nothing about. The detail the author goes into is amazing. He is obviously very knowledgeable and passionate about the topic. At times, I was enthralled and couldn't put the book down. There were other points where I struggled, and when I was wading through the chapter about some of the experimental governments the Spanish tried, I al [...]

    25. Well-researched and detailed account of the Spanish conquest of the Incas and their demise at the hands of the Spanish. Hemming pulls from original sources to tell the story of Pizarro and the conquistadors search for gold and the confiscatory transfer of valuable Inca religous object made from gold and silver back to the Spanish king to convince him to permit the Christian conversion of the Inca and the further exploration of Peru and Equador. The Inca were not only vulnerable to the avaricious [...]

    26. I just read this. I was actually reading another book at the time and heard of this from an article or documentary. I was inspired to write a song about the Spanish invasion of the Peruvian empire. I had read a book a couple years ago about Hernando de Soto and his explorations into North America. It covered his career in the Peruvian conquests, which had made him famous in Spain for his daring exploits. But the book did not cover the whole Incan period of that conquest nearly enough. This book [...]

    27. People tend to assume sometimes that if someone has a particularly affinity for travelling in Peru that they are interested in the history of the Incas—since it's what first comes to mind when anyone thinks of Peru, mainly because of Machu Picchu. In fact, I liked Peru for a whole lot of other reasons and was in fact a bit of a philistine when it came to the Incas. I'd visited Machu Picchu before ever reading this, and had appreciated it mostly for its physical beauty. This book changed my per [...]

    28. I decided to read this after a rather sudden and unprepared trip to Peru where I followed some of the trails of the Incas, starting in Lima, then staying a few days in Cusco, visiting Machu Picchu, Sacsahuaman, then continued by train to Puno, Lake Titicaca, and on to Arequipa, saw the Nazca lines, and returned to Lima. I should have read the book before I left. The sights, museums, what I saw would have told me more.

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