Brave Jack and the Unicorn

Brave Jack and the Unicorn Neither handsome nor clever Jack the youngest of three brothers causes his widowed mother much concern The family is convinced he is nothing but a fool When his brothers go off to seek their fortune

  • Title: Brave Jack and the Unicorn
  • Author: Janet McNaughton Susan Tooke
  • ISBN: 9780887766770
  • Page: 490
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Neither handsome nor clever, Jack the youngest of three brothers causes his widowed mother much concern The family is convinced he is nothing but a fool When his brothers go off to seek their fortune and don t return, Jack is sent to find them Along the way he performs good deeds for helpless creatures, who repay his kindness in magical ways Hearing of an evil magiNeither handsome nor clever, Jack the youngest of three brothers causes his widowed mother much concern The family is convinced he is nothing but a fool When his brothers go off to seek their fortune and don t return, Jack is sent to find them Along the way he performs good deeds for helpless creatures, who repay his kindness in magical ways Hearing of an evil magician who controls the life of the princess, Jack poses as a suitor and faces three tests but can he find the elusive unicorn and save the princess from her fate Acclaimed Newfoundland author Janet McNaughton tells a classic tale of good and evil, accompanied by Susan Tooke s illuminating paintings, rich with influences from the Middle Ages, Celtic symbolism, and Newfoundland s breathtaking coastal landscape.

    One thought on “Brave Jack and the Unicorn”

    1. Janet McNaughton's Brave Jack and the Unicorn is an original Canadian, or more to the point Newfoundland inspired fairy tale (but one most certainly very much reliant on both Newfoundland and European folkloric themes and elements), and both the author's presented, imagined, constructed narrative and Susan Tooke's accompanying illustrations are indeed magical and evocative. And while as rather a folklore purist at best, I was (at first) more than a bit leery of this here tale, as I was worried t [...]

    2. Jack is not as handsome or as clever as his older brothers, but he is kind. The title of this traditional third-son-makes-good as almost a misnomer; although Jack is reasonably brave, it is his kindness that characterizes him and allows him to succeed on his rather accidental quest.After his older brothers fail to return from seeking their fortunes, Jack's unloving mother sends him to find them. As is often the case in stories of this sort, Jack performs acts of generosity or kindness towards va [...]

    3. I fell in love with this tale. When I first looked at the cover, I didn’t think I’d even like it, but it grew on me. Yes, this original fairy tale, with a Newfoundland, Canadian landscape is formulaic (three sons/the youngest “good” son/the winning of the princess by going through trials, etc.) but it’s told so lovingly, and it has an end I really appreciated. I tend not to like endings where there is too much vengeance and here there is really none at all. Not really.I’d also assume [...]

    4. Written for read-alouds. Jack is a role-model of kindness and duty for young men to emulate. The illustrations present a dual world of contemporary clothing and housing gradually merging into the fairy realm. I liked this effect and think that it will draw children into the story.

    5. I am a huge folklore/fairy tale fan and I loved the story. It had similar motifs to other folk tales I have read: someone shows kindness to small creatures, such as ants or bees, and is rewarded for his kindness later. I liked the illustrations, but did not love them. But what was interesting is that the illustrator (Susan Tooke) painted landscapes of various parts of Newfoundland, where the story takes place. The place names are listed on the verso of the title page. Also typical of this folkta [...]

    6. This was a familiar tale to me. I'm not sure if I've read this before or if the tales upon which this story was based are what I've heard before. Either way, this story didn't wow me as amazing or original. It was a nice telling of a tale of kindness and bravery, and the illustrations were a good accompaniment, but still - the book just didn't wow me.

    7. Jack is brave and kind, and when he sets off to find his two brothers, his kindness leads him to find good fortune and love.

    8. WHY: This book reminds me of a Latvian tale Logan liked, The Castle of the Cats, adapted by the fabulous Eric Kimmel. In both stories, the least likely (on the surface) of three brothers to win the heart of a lady is the one who finally succeeds. In this tale, it's the least attractive one and in Kimmel's story it's the least clever. Both stories reward kindness. Although unicorns don't have the quite the draw for L that cats do, L is likely to love the illustrations.

    9. My 7-year-old: "I love the unicorn and how nice Jack is."My 4-year-old: "I loved it when the magician turned into a dragon and when the eagle got the rabbit."This original Newfoundland folktale is about a young son who is unremarkable in personality or appearance yet accomplishes much through his compassion for others. It took kindness and wit and not bravery or muscle to outsmart the magician.

    10. This was a good book that I categorized in the fantasy genre. I would recommend this book for children in fourth grade or fifth grade. There are longer words, longer ages, and difficult things to understand for a younger child. The reader can learn social skills through the message that this book is introducing. There are no content concerns that I saw. Jack goes on a journey to find his brother and on the way he saved a princess.

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