La Nébuleuse du crabe

La N buleuse du crabe La premi re fois que Crab fut pris pour un l phant il se contenta de hausser les paules et passa son chemin La deuxi me fois que Crab fut pris pour un l phant il laissa chapper un geste de mauvaise

  • Title: La Nébuleuse du crabe
  • Author: Éric Chevillard
  • ISBN: 9782707319685
  • Page: 219
  • Format: Paperback
  • La premi re fois que Crab fut pris pour un l phant, il se contenta de hausser les paules et passa son chemin La deuxi me fois que Crab fut pris pour un l phant, il laissa chapper un geste de mauvaise humeur La troisi me fois, enfin, devinant que ses ennemis avaient complot de le rendre fou, il ceintura vivement l insolent et l envoya valser dix huit m tres de l La premi re fois que Crab fut pris pour un l phant, il se contenta de hausser les paules et passa son chemin La deuxi me fois que Crab fut pris pour un l phant, il laissa chapper un geste de mauvaise humeur La troisi me fois, enfin, devinant que ses ennemis avaient complot de le rendre fou, il ceintura vivement l insolent et l envoya valser dix huit m tres de l Tel est Crab, dont ce livre voudrait rapporter quelques gestes remarquables et que l on verra ainsi avec un peu de chance plier le ciel comme un drap ou se tuer par inadvertance en croyant poignarder son jumeau, puis devenir torrent pour mieux suivre sa pente A moins videmment qu il ne se terre plut t tout du long dans son antre obscur, s agissant de Crab, on ne peut rien promettre.

    One thought on “La Nébuleuse du crabe”

    1. Who is Crab? Crab is a human abstraction. Applying absurdist methods to his associative thinking Éric Chevillard limns an iridescently nebulous portrait of humankind.“Crab was born with webbed feet. His mother kept it a secret. His father beat him. His two brothers and two sisters mocked him cruelly. A sad childhood. But time passes. His parents died. The oldest brother made his career in the army, the other perished in an accident. The first sister married a former varsity shotputter, and th [...]

    2. کراب شروع می‌کند به کشیدن طرحی از پرستوها، تک به تک، از همه‌ی آن‌ها. و اگر نکند چه کسی جز او این کار را بر عهده خواهد گرفت؟ سختی کارش بیشتر در خطر دو بار کشیدن یک پرستوست ـمسلما تعداد آن‌ها کار را سخت می‌کند، ولی این کار با شکیبایی و پشتکار، که او کم ندارد، شدنی است. خوشبختانه [...]

    3. Because I have too much a conventional mind, I love it when some absolutely bonkers French cheri, completely off his rocker, called Chevillard, becomes my Chevalier in shenanigans of the imaginarium.Chevillard is a visionary; or he has visions, or at the very least something more than your standard 20/20 vision. In 52 separate and standalone vignettes, he takes up this Crab person, and rearranges him juxtaposed to reality in all kinds of non linear perspective, popping in and out of all known di [...]

    4. Chevillard maps the outer reaches of the novel form, while in the process calling into bold question whether there are in fact actual outer reaches or simply various arbitrarily assigned borders beyond which stretches a black void of infinity. Several times I was tempted to abandon this due to its wildly disparate wanderings from chapter to chapter, and sometimes even from paragraph to paragraph. But Chevillard's alluring serpentine style kept drawing me back in. Best read in small stretches, as [...]

    5. I don't think I have yet to find a book that confused and amused me quite so much as this text. La Nébuleuse du Crabe is a particularly challenging text, rendered more approachable by Jordan Stump's translation. I read this text the first time with both the original and translation at my disposal, reading each 'conte' in French first and then in English. Not only was it a wonderful learning experience for my language skills, but an especially troubling and hilarious one as well for my tastes in [...]

    6. There is no coherent narrative here. Not even a semblance of an interest on the author's part to engage, entertain, invite the reader. None of the snippets make any sense whatsoever. And yet, these snippets seem like they have come out of a grown up Calvin's imaginary world. His hero can do everything, be everything, but be invisible and a nobody. Some of the chapters really touch a nerve, a thought you may have once had in passing, and it feels good to see it on paper. There is one piece in whi [...]

    7. Crab représente toute l'humanité : il est grand et petit, vieux et jeune, gros et maigre, timide et extravagant, bête et intelligent, vivant et mort, c'est un original et un discret homme moyen, tout et son contraire ; il n'est personne en particulier ; il est tout le monde. On ne parle pas de Nébuleuse pour rien dans le titre ; Crab est un personnage flou, informe, nébuleux. Mais la nébuleuse est aussi le fruit de la mort d'une étoile ; elle contient tous les éléments nécessaires à e [...]

    8. When Crab was asked to write a review about his very own biography, he wondered how he would be able to judge it. First of all, who was this mysterious Eric Chevillard whom he had never met, and what could he possibly want to do with a life defined by change, without any sort of unifying element to it. And more importantly, would he judge it according to its faithfulness, or its literary merit? Crab himself was not exactly sure of what he had and had not lived, but he definitely didn't want ther [...]

    9. A great translation of a great book. I read this translation at the same time as the original text in French by Eric Chevillard in order to develop my French language skills. This text is unique for sure while still evoquing the character, Plume, from Une Certaine Plume by Michaux. So very strange and terribly amusing, this book will definitely entertain a reader familiar with Chevillard's other works. If this worked for you in French, I'd suggest Un Fantôme by Chevillard - a continuation of th [...]

    10. This book is ridiculous. Reading this book is the equivalent of seeing a band that has one player wailing on their instrument without playing any true note or melody, the drummer not keeping a beat and just hitting the drum repeatedly, a singer moaning out vocals out of key and some white guy in a ponytail dancing in the background in his underwear. You turn to a member in the audience and ask what it is you are listening/watching and he responds "it's progressive. It's avant-garde" This is what [...]

    11. Might have to try this some other time Right now it's ringing hollow. Funny, sure, but I'm not convinced there's much more there than facile invention and a sensibility in a predetermined rut of self-annihilated bleakness in the guise of "progressive" literature. Read that Chevillard was linked/compared to Michaux, so this morning dropped him and shifted to Michaux, who gave me what I needed.

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