The Mysterious Disappearence of Leon (I Mean Noel)

The Mysterious Disappearence of Leon I Mean Noel For the answers to many important questions children should try this story crammed with baffling word puzzles a dozen zany characters uproariously funny situations and unmitigated slapstick The Ho

  • Title: The Mysterious Disappearence of Leon (I Mean Noel)
  • Author: Ellen Raskin
  • ISBN: 9781101486054
  • Page: 460
  • Format: ebook
  • For the answers to many important questions, children should try this story crammed with baffling word puzzles, a dozen zany characters, uproariously funny situations, and unmitigated slapstick The Horn Book Illustrated This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

    One thought on “The Mysterious Disappearence of Leon (I Mean Noel)”

    1. The Mysterious Disappearance of Leon (I Mean Noel) is an amazing book that can be equally enjoyed by adults and children alike. Adults reading the book see more layers to it than the kids, but the read is just as mysterious and enjoyable (although the idea of marriage at that young an age will be a squicky one). If you have read Ellen Raskin's Westing Game, and even if you haven't, this is a book you really need to get your hands on. I've read some of her other books, but absolutely nothing comp [...]

    2. 3.5 stars. This is not as good as The Westing Game, but has much the same sort of humor, if I remember correctly.

    3. A favorite. This book progresses in just the right way. I was fascinated by the word-people when I first read it as a kid, and this time I could clearly see in my mind's eye how this story would read as a film! Oh how dramatic the Glub-Blub scene would be! Mrs. Carrillon kneeling on flotsam, Leon (I mean Noel) sinking into the ocean, "Noel glub C blub all. I glub, new" And WHAM! Yardarm to the noggin. It's such a sweet story of people who find they loved each other all along.Additionally, the le [...]

    4. Amusing, lighter fare from Raskin. The puzzle mystery in this one revolves around solving the "glub-blubs," that is, filling in chunks of a sentence that were swallowed by the ocean as a mysterious person drowned while trying to communicate a secret message to Mrs. Carillon. She is assisted in her detecting (solve the riddle, find her missing husband) by twins Tina and Tony and the gentle Augie Kunkel. Charming.

    5. Oh I wanted to like this more than I did. But the puzzles made little sense, with too many red herrings and other not-helpful hints, and the mystery made not much more sense. (view spoiler)[I knew all along that there was a reason Noel did not want to be found, but I have no idea how we're to figure out why he didn't, or what the puzzle was. (hide spoiler)] And the HEA ending? Nah.

    6. I want to give it a 5 but that's because it was a personally transformative book. The transformation, honestly, had way more to do with the context of my life than it did the book. That's not to say it wasn't an awesome piece of lit to put in the hands of a fifth-grade reader in the 1970s. It was recommended to me by my 5th grade reading teacher. Prior to this, I was only interested in reading non fiction or fiction that read like an historical account. This book gave me a great big taste of, "H [...]

    7. I first read this when I was in 6th grade (I'm 36 as of this writing and still read this every once in a while!). Titles are often times the first thing that grabs me when I browse for a book, and this title was no excecption!This is the first fiction book I read that included unusual footnotes and typography, leading to admirations of David Foster Wallace, James Joyce, and other experimental writers. The fascination with words and symbols were also a plus for me. It's a fast and funny story tha [...]

    8. Ellen Raskin was one of my favorite authors when I was in elementary school. I kind of thought her books would get less disturbing as I got older, but

    9. An awesome, funny read. Suffers a bit from dated attitudes towards women and children (two of the main characters get married at 12?!?), but overall, it still holds up.

    10. A favorite. This book progresses in just the right way. I was fascinated by the word-people when I first read it as a kid, and this time I could clearly see in my mind's eye how this story would read as a film! Oh how dramatic the Glub-Blub scene would be! Mrs. Carrillon kneeling on flotsam, Leon (I mean Noel) sinking into the ocean, "Noel glub C blub all. I glub, new" And WHAM! Yardarm to the noggin. It's such a sweet story of people who find they loved each other all along.Additionally, the le [...]

    11. I just finished reading this to my boys. They loved it!!! We ended upreading much more than my usual one chapter because we were all enjoyingit so much. It had been years since I read it and I had forgotten the plot, so I was as eager as the boys to see the puzzle of Leon solved.I will have to definitely read more Raskin with them.

    12. The writing style does not work for me but I do think the mystery is rather good, albeit having some cumbersome explanation in the middle. As a whole it will probably captivate a younger reader so for once even though I usually think adults should be able to enjoy a good middle grade book, I think young audience will appreciate this book more than I do.

    13. Read and re-read the library's copy of this, over a couple of years, until I managed to work out all the answers on my own. (Yes, I'd checked them already, but I wanted to see how to get from point A to point B on my own.)

    14. Fun book with a classic 70's feel. Definitely will be reading this one to my kids. Highly recommend for kids and adults!

    15. This was Ellen Raskin's first novel so I wasn't sure what to expect. (It's her fourth and final novel, The Westing Game, that made her famous.)It's a quirky and surreal tale of a woman who spends her entire adult life searching for a man named Noel (or Leon) who drowned (possibly) in Florida.The bulk of the book consisters of Mrs Carillon and her two adopted twin orphans, Tony and Tina, trying to make sense of the last words of Leon/Noel. And because his last words were half-uttered underwater, [...]

    16. I read this as a kid a BUNCH of times and thought it would be fun to read it again. The puzzles are fun but I don't think the book holds up all that well for this day and age. Still, I imagine a kid that like solving puzzles might like it. Funny, I didn't remember much of it at all or the solution. I would rate this as either a 3 or 4 for a kid and a 2 or 3 for an adult. Fun book but I bet there are more modern takes on it now (and also since society has changed greatly since this book was writt [...]

    17. Pedro j-The Mysterious Disappearance of Leon was boring! Just kidding! It was interesting. Meet Mrs.Leon Carillon she is a nice woman she also is gonna meet her husband, but they haven't seen each other since five but what she doesn't know is her husband will disappear!!! That's not all she has to search also for Leon or is it Noel ? But while she goes to state or city to find Leon or Noel she has to answer few questions.Will she find Leon or is it Noel?I recommend this book to the people who li [...]

    18. Many of my childhood favorites sadly did not stand the test of time and were not appreciated by my own kids. The good news is that this book seems as fresh and quirky as ever and my 11 year old son really enjoyed it. I only wish they had kept the old crazy purple cover!

    19. One of my life-shaping childhood favorites, as were several of her books. The first author it occurred to me could be alive, only to look her up, as I worked in a children's room at the library, to find she had died recently, too young.

    20. This book was so weird! I probably would have loved it as a kid. As an adult I enjoyed the quirkiness of it, but I didn't fall in love.

    21. Just as weird as I remember it being when I read it as a kid. Thought it might make more sense now? Nope.

    22. A former childhood favorite that I wanted to re-read to see if it was as good as I had remembered it.Sadly, it was not.

    23. This is such a bizarre little puzzle book, but I enjoyed it. Super easy, quick read. Probably more appropriate for 8-11 year olds.

    24. This review also appears on my blog, Read-at-Home Mom.The Mysterious Disappearance of Leon (I Mean Noel) is a bizarre 1971 middle grade mystery by The Westing Game author Ellen Raskin. Main character Mrs. Carillon is married off to a young man named Leon Carillon when she is just a child. When the couple are finally of age to live as husband and wife, they are out in a boat together when a storm hits. As he struggles to keep his head above water, Leon makes just one parting remark, before he mys [...]

    25. “The Mysterious Disappearance of Leon (I Mean Noel)” is where Raskin first comes into her own as a writer. I would describe it as Daniel Pinkwater-esque, but since Pinkwater didn't really break through until "Lizard Music", published five years after this book, perhaps it would be more accurate to say that Pinkwater's works sometimes have a Raskin-esque feel to them. Like a classic Pinkwater novel, “The Mysterious Disappearance” is funny in an off-kilter way, featuring unusual characters [...]

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