The End of Modern History in the Middle East

The End of Modern History in the Middle East Bernard Lewis looks at the new era in the Middle East With the departure of imperial powers the region must now on its own resolve the political economic cultural and societal problems that prev

  • Title: The End of Modern History in the Middle East
  • Author: Bernard Lewis
  • ISBN: 9780817912949
  • Page: 491
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Bernard Lewis looks at the new era in the Middle East With the departure of imperial powers, the region must now, on its own, resolve the political, economic, cultural, and societal problems that prevent it from accomplishing the next stage in the advance of civilization There is enough in the traditional culture of Islam on the one hand and the modern experience of theBernard Lewis looks at the new era in the Middle East With the departure of imperial powers, the region must now, on its own, resolve the political, economic, cultural, and societal problems that prevent it from accomplishing the next stage in the advance of civilization There is enough in the traditional culture of Islam on the one hand and the modern experience of the Muslim peoples on the other, he explains, to provide the basis for an advance toward freedom in the true sense of that word.

    One thought on “The End of Modern History in the Middle East”

    1. Bernard Lewis is back on the shelves with his thesis that the era of modern history is finished in the Middle East. This - and how he goes about proving his argument - will no doubt prove controversial. Lewis argues that it is no longer enough for Middle Eastern states and peoples to blame the west for the predicament they find themselves in: the end of modern history - the legacy of colonialism is no longer held accountable for the failures of modern post-colonial states in the region, but rath [...]

    2. Four essays dealing with various aspects of the Middle East. Dr. Lewis is the acknowledged dean of Middle Eastern studies in the West.

    3. This book is a collection of essays which are interesting but not tied to one another. Efram Karsh’s argument (In Empire of the Sands), which claims that even during the colonial period the Middle East has largely controlled its own history, moderates the importance of the main theme of Lewis’s first essay, which is that with ending of colonial rule—and to a greater extent after the ending of the Cold War—the Middle East is now making its own history and cannot blame or praise outsider f [...]

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