Sandhill and Whooping Cranes: Ancient Voices over America's Wetlands

Sandhill and Whooping Cranes Ancient Voices over America s Wetlands Driving west from Lincoln to Grand Island Nebraska Paul A Johnsgard remarks is like driving backward in time I suspect he says that the migrating cranes of a pre ice age period some ten million y

Sandhill Crane Hunting in Tessee TN The modern era of sandhill crane hunting in Tennessee began with the late waterfowl season on November , and ran through January , The US, Canada and Mexico manage sandhill crane harvest through the same regulatory mechanisms as waterfowl and Sandhill Crane Identification, All About Birds, Cornell Regional Differences Sandhill Cranes are similar in plumage across their range, but they vary in size Lesser Sandhill Cranes breed in the Arctic and are the smallest the largest form Greater Sandhill Crane breeds in the northern U.S. Whooping crane The whooping crane Grus americana , the tallest North American bird, is an endangered crane species named for its whooping sound Along with the sandhill crane, it is one of only two crane species found in North America.The whooping crane s lifespan is estimated to be to years in the wild After being pushed to the brink of extinction by unregulated hunting and loss of habitat to just Cranes Sandhill Crane Sandhill Crane Grus canadensis Appearance Sandhill cranes Grus canadensis are long legged, long necked, gray, heron like birds with a patch of bald, red skin on top of their head. Whooping Crane International Crane Foundation FUN FACT The Whooping Crane is the tallest bird in North America. On Ancient Wings The Sandhill Cranes of North America Rising from sandbars on the Platte River with clarion calls, the sandhill crane Grus canadensis feels the urgency of spring migration.Elegant, noble, and spiritual, the sandhill crane is one of the most ancient of all birds. Whooping Crane Life History, All About Birds, Cornell Lab The Whooping Crane is the tallest bird in North America and one of the most awe inspiring, with its snowy white plumage, crimson cap, bugling call, and graceful courtship dance It s also among our rarest birds and a testament to the tenacity and creativity of conservation biologists The species declined to around birds in the s but, through captive breeding, wetland management, and an Whooping Crane Audubon Field Guide One of the rarest North American birds, and also one of the largest and most magnificent Once fairly widespread on the northern prairies, it was brought to the brink of extinction in the s, but strict protection has brought the wild population back to well over one hundred. Where to Photograph Sandhill Cranes On Manitoulin Island MANITOULIN ISLAND, Ontario, Canada An important migratory staging ground for birds My preferred time to visit is during fall migration, anytime between mid September to beginning of October, when you can easily observe hundreds of Sandhill Cranes.The cranes stop to feed and rest during the crossing of the Great Lakes, so they are relatively easy to find. Iain Nicolson Audubon Center at Rowe Sanctuary January marks the official launch of the Year of the Bird an exciting partnership between National Geographic, Audubon, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, BirdLife International, and dozens of other partners, in honor of the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

  • Title: Sandhill and Whooping Cranes: Ancient Voices over America's Wetlands
  • Author: Paul A. Johnsgard
  • ISBN: 9780803234963
  • Page: 318
  • Format: Paperback
  • Driving west from Lincoln to Grand Island, Nebraska, Paul A Johnsgard remarks, is like driving backward in time I suspect, he says, that the migrating cranes of a pre ice age period some ten million years ago would fully understand every nuance of the crane conversation going on today along the Platte Johnsgard has spent nearly a half century observing cranes, fromDriving west from Lincoln to Grand Island, Nebraska, Paul A Johnsgard remarks, is like driving backward in time I suspect, he says, that the migrating cranes of a pre ice age period some ten million years ago would fully understand every nuance of the crane conversation going on today along the Platte Johnsgard has spent nearly a half century observing cranes, from a yearly foray to Nebraska s Platte River valley to see the spring migration, to pilgrimages to the birds wintering grounds in Arizona and nesting territory in Alaska In this book he draws from his own extensive experience as well as the latest science to offer a richly detailed and deeply felt account of the ecology of sandhill and whooping cranes and the wetlands in which they live.Incorporating current information on changing migration patterns, population trends, and breeding ranges, Johnsgard explains the life cycle of the crane, as well as the significance of these species to our natural world He also writes frankly of the uncertain future of these majestic birds, as cranes and their habitats face the effects of climate change and increasing human population pressures Illustrated with the author s own ink drawings and containing a detailed guide to crane viewing sites in the United States and Canada, this book is at once an invaluable reference and an eloquent testimony to how much these birds truly mean.

    One thought on “Sandhill and Whooping Cranes: Ancient Voices over America's Wetlands”

    1. Not what I expected, though not having read any of his books previously, I perhaps didn't have realistic expectations. This was a fairly scholarly and extremely detailed presentation of facts regarding cranes. Migration patterns of certain flocks (down to the level of which county they are in during various times of the year, and discussion of whether Canadian Sandhill cranes constitute a separate taxonimical category of crane between the Lesser and Great Sandhills comprise much of the book.I gu [...]

    2. First and foremost, this volume is an update to the author’s earlier work, and should not be read as an introduction to America’s cranes and why so many people love them. Though I appreciate what Johnsgard is doing in Ancient Voices Over America’s Wetlands, I can only recommend this book in a guarded manner. Much of the text is a recitation of crane populations, including places and dates when nesting and fledgling groups have been spotted. Though this is valuable information for the speci [...]

    3. 1. Twin Text Fiction BookHave You Seen Mary? by Jeff Kurrus, 20122. Rationale for FictionI chose Have You Seen Mary to extend Sandhill and Whooping Cranes because my students actually had the privilege of meeting Jeff Kurrus last year! He came to our school for an author visit and talked to the student body about being an author and photographer. It was really neat! So many of the kids had questions about Sandhill Cranes that Jeff answered (if he knew the answer), but I was thinking these books [...]

    4. 1.) A fiction “twin text” title, author and copyright date:Have you seen Mary? by Jeff Kurrus (January, 2012)2.) Rationale for the twin text selection and how it extends and/or enhances the non-fiction book:` I chose Have You Seen Mary? by Jeff Kurrus because it tells the “story” of the sandhills cranes. The author has made the cranes relatable by making them into characters of a story. It will enhance the factual basis of the non-fiction text, Sandhill and Whooping Cranes, which is very [...]

    5. I've tried reading this one twice now. While I am very interested in the topic, I just can't get through the book. The author jam packs the book with as many facts as he can. I appreciate that in theory but he does it with little ability to smooth them out into a narrative. It's not that he doesn't try, it's just that he doesn't seem to know how. The book is filled with non sequiturs, including whole paragraphs that seem plunked in at random.

    6. This book is 98% statistics and maybe two percent poetry. It does have a good appendix which any crane watcher would value. I will keep it on the shelf.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *