Brilliant, Crazy, Cocky: How the Top 1% of Entrepreneurs Profit from Global Chaos

Brilliant Crazy Cocky How the Top % of Entrepreneurs Profit from Global Chaos An unforgettable portrait of the emerging world s entrepreneurial dynamos Brilliant Crazy Cocky is the story about that top % of people who do to change their worlds through greed and ambition than

  • Title: Brilliant, Crazy, Cocky: How the Top 1% of Entrepreneurs Profit from Global Chaos
  • Author: Sarah Lacy
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 293
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • An unforgettable portrait of the emerging world s entrepreneurial dynamos Brilliant, Crazy, Cocky is the story about that top 1% of people who do to change their worlds through greed and ambition than politicians, NGOs and nonprofits ever can This new breed of self starter is taking local turmoil and turning it into opportunities, making millions, creating thousandsAn unforgettable portrait of the emerging world s entrepreneurial dynamos Brilliant, Crazy, Cocky is the story about that top 1% of people who do to change their worlds through greed and ambition than politicians, NGOs and nonprofits ever can This new breed of self starter is taking local turmoil and turning it into opportunities, making millions, creating thousands of jobs and changing the face of modern entrepreneurship at the same time To tell this story, Lacy spent forty weeks traveling through Asia, South America and Africa hunting down the most impressive up and comers the developed world has never heard oft The individuals profiled in Brilliant, Crazy, Cocky are distinct products of their own cultures, yet they share that same unmistakable cocktail of delusion, ambition, and brilliance that drove Bill Gates, Fred Smith, Donald Trump, and every other iconic American entrepreneur of the last few decades.

    One thought on “Brilliant, Crazy, Cocky: How the Top 1% of Entrepreneurs Profit from Global Chaos”

    1. Not bad? It wasn't life changing, but a good number of the stories felt relevant if not somewhat inspiring. The chapter about Rwanda was quite moving. The writing style was pretty sensationalist though which rubbed me the wrong way. I would loan it to a friend but not necessarily recommend they spend money on it, so if you'd like to borrow it, you know how to find me.

    2. Author, Sarah Lacy, is inspired by "truly great entrepreneurs" so much, she seeks them out in all corners of the globe. For this book, she travelled to eleven different countries in about 40 weeks. Interviewing entrepreneurs, investors, policy makers and everyday locals. She provides us with a deep insight into how a handful of creative risk-takers have seized opportunities to not only enrich their own lives, but to also do good for their country, especially in places like Rwanda, that was ravag [...]

    3. I wanted to read this book thinking it might teach me to better identify entrepreneurial opportunities, but the book was less about that and more about specific emerging markets and where they are in comparison to the US in terms of business evolution. To be honest, I think that made for a more interesting read. Also bonus mention of my namesake's namesake, Virginia Dare, on page 160:"But it's not just who colonized you that matters. After all, the English colonized India too, and the United Sta [...]

    4. I really loved this book. I work in the tech community, and it's a complete echo chamber. It's important to remember that not all innovation is US based and to see how other companies are thriving in chaos. Not everyone needs daily catered lunches to be successful or thrive. Sarah paints a picture of the entrepreneurial communities in Israel, Brazil, Indonesia, India, China, etc. that tell compelling stories of what makes the communities tick. I admire her courage in traveling the world for 40-w [...]

    5. I really liked this book- it was a quick and easy read and talked about the local economies in several of the emerging markets, what local entrepreneurs are facing and how their respective governments/economies are helping stimulate entrepreneurial activity or not. I think Lacy made some great observations about the different countries she visited and think her point about people not having anything to lose is really relevant and plays a large part in whether people feel motivated to solve probl [...]

    6. Quick read. I was right there with the author and the characters, that's how vivid and real the stories were. The comparison of the two notorious tragedies of two so distant worlds - the Kurt Cobain's suicide and Rwanda's genocide. This one is enough to see, how uncompromisingly honest, even cynical at times, the narrative of the book can be. Yet however, the book is about emerging worlds, so different, notwithstanding their dark pasts, unique cultural legacies, survivals, timeframes of the grea [...]

    7. A totally fascinating look at the tech and entrepreneurial markets in developing countries. I thought it would be a quick read without much surprises, but there was so much to learn, and so much that reminds you of just how myopic your own worldview can be, even if you constantly endeavor to maintain a larger worldview. A palette cleanser. An antidote to screwy thinking about American Exceptionalism. A reminder to hustle. An eye opening reminder of how much the fear of losing something limits yo [...]

    8. Excellent inspiring book about how the pain of some countries gives birth to entrepreneurs who seize opportunities (not always the most glamorous ones), sometimes eschew venture capital (they don't always need it) and build empires that educate, entertain, and help lift people out of poverty. This isn't a "I work for a non-profit, aren't I great" book, but rather, one that shows how enterprises that help improve the quality of life in emerging countries can also be good business.

    9. Once again, Sarah Lacy takes us on a tour of Internet entrepreneurship. This time, it's outside Silicon Valley and covers such areas as Brazil, Israel, Indonesia, India, China and Rwanda. That too me is the problem - the scope is simply too vast. The chapters are uneven and some are a lot more interesting than others. Still an enjoyable read but I didn't get as much out of it as I did from her other book "Once You're Lucky, Twice You're Good" which is a must read.

    10. I loved this book! It was such an interesting and personal view of entrepreneurs all over the world who are building some amazing companies. I loved Sarah's first hand view of the different cultures and personalities, laid on top of larger economic trends. I'm not usually one for "business books" and while this is technically in that category it was as good as any of the fiction books that I've read lately. Highly recommend! And not just because Sarah's a good friend :)

    11. This is the second book by Sarah Lacy, former editor of Tech Crunch. In this non-fiction book, she travels around the world interviewing entrepreneurs from different countries and divides the book into what she has learned in each of these places. The lessons she shares are insightful and I enjoyed the personal stories from the entrepreneurs, but her first book titled Once You're Lucky, Twice You're Good is much, much more interesting.

    12. Excellent perspective on entrepreneurship around the world. Forces you to step back from the Silicon Valley hype to see the desperate passion that drives entrepreneurs to take tremendous risks (without VCs throwing money at their feet). There are some truly inspirational, uplifting stories that drive home the potential of entrepreneurship to strengthen and build an entire country/culture, in a way that's not captured by monetary returns alone.

    13. This book is kind of a brief introduction to the startups and what happened to the emerging world like China, India. You will find a lot if you've never been there. However, it is an entrance level reading for the people who are familiar with the stories.

    14. I am a big fan of Sarah Lacy. I read PandoDaily a couple of times a week and love when she is on with Jason Calacanis. That said I thought the book was alright. Worth the time to read, but nothing really earth shattering.

    15. Anything that disputes American exceptionalism is fine by me! Good insight into the conditions, institutions, and individuals that make for great entrepreneurial success.

    16. A laundry list of entrepreneurial ventures in emerging markets (Israel, Indonesia, the usual BRIC suspects). No real overarching theme or takeaways from this book, but interesting read.

    17. A nice little primer across the entrepreneur landscape across the world. Although some of the observations veers into stereotypes such as "All Indians love to argue".

    18. Very interesting book. Insights into what entrepreneurs do in other parts of the world and most important what drives them!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *