Confessions, Romances, Secrets, and Temptations: Archer St. John and the St. John Romance Comics

Confessions Romances Secrets and Temptations Archer St John and the St John Romance Comics Confessions Romances Secrets and Temptations is the companion volume to John Benson s popular anthology of romance comics Romance Without Tears Published in the s by Archer St John the storie

  • Title: Confessions, Romances, Secrets, and Temptations: Archer St. John and the St. John Romance Comics
  • Author: John Benson
  • ISBN: 9781560977919
  • Page: 154
  • Format: Paperback
  • Confessions, Romances, Secrets, and Temptations is the companion volume to John Benson s popular anthology of romance comics, Romance Without Tears Published in the 1950s by Archer St John, the stories in that volume were decidedly different from the typical romance comics, just as St John was decidedly different from the typical comics publisher This new book exploresConfessions, Romances, Secrets, and Temptations is the companion volume to John Benson s popular anthology of romance comics, Romance Without Tears Published in the 1950s by Archer St John, the stories in that volume were decidedly different from the typical romance comics, just as St John was decidedly different from the typical comics publisher This new book explores the background of these comics and their publisher, including a short biography, interviews with the editors and artists who worked for the company, and critical commentary.In his research for Romance Without Tears, the author was left with a rich body of material about one of the few quality driven 1950s comics publishers St John s reputation as a fair and honest publisher attracted many of the top artists of the day, including Matt Baker, Ric Estrada, Everett Raymond Kinstler, Joe Kubert, Bob Powell, Leonard Starr, and George Tuska In addition to interviewing Estrada, Kubert, and Starr, Benson talks with several St John staffers, including editor Irwin Stein, production man Warren Kremer, and editorial assistant Nadine King Together they provide an engaging account of Archer St John and the atmosphere he nourished to create these distinctive comics.Confessions contains a time chart of every title published by St John all genres , showing issue number and date, and a complete, detailed checklist of all the company s romance comics, giving story titles, artist credits, and cross indexing the extensive reprints The book is lavishly illustrated with examples of the comics, and includes rare photos and other visuals from the period.

    One thought on “Confessions, Romances, Secrets, and Temptations: Archer St. John and the St. John Romance Comics”

    1. My girlfriend bought me this book for my birthday just a couple days ago, largely because I've been interested in the St. John Publishing Company for the past couple of months and needed to know a little more about some of the creators who worked there; specifically Dana Dutch. Conveniently enough, Dutch was one of the primary focuses of this book! Unfortunately, the man is still a bit of an enigma. If you're someone who is also interested in learning about Mr. Dutch, you won't find a whole lot [...]

    2. Definitive- chocked full of insight and history on St. John and highlighting the company's distinguishing factor and importance in comics history. An essential comics history reference well-worth a saw buck. Also some great Chicago-related history and 'easter egg' map inside.Considering the research category and genre (and the fact that most people associated are or will be dead and gone), it is unlikely that more information will ever surface. Therefore, in light of the above, the amount of inf [...]

    3. An excellent bit of publishing history focussed on the romance comics published by St John publishing company. Interviews with editors & artists, a bio of the founder, etc, all nicely done. This is the company that also started Manhunt and Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Mag and the discussion touches on them, sadly all too briefly. But what makes me ding this book a star is the way the author treats hackwork aimed at 12-year olds like great art. This attitude seems to be peculiar to comic book f [...]

    4. I liked this book a lot. Two thirds of it was of interviews of those who worked at that company in the early fifties. It became an almost rashomon like story of what people remembered. The book peters out at the end with a some unconnected essays about the romance comics St John published. I liked it, it told me of a small niche in comics history I had no idea existed.

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